Category Archives: T Bone Burnett

THE DEMISE OF THE MASK (VOL 10)__NAPHTHALENE MAGNOLIAS #28___

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Hello All.

Welcome to Volume Ten of the MixTape series: The Demise Of The Mask. –(Volume One here)__(Volume Two here)__(Volume Three here)__(Volume Four here)__(Volume Five here)__(Volume Six here)__(Volume Seven here)__(Volume Eight here)__(Volume Nine here)-

This here MixTape features some fine, fine music! There’s both Madeleine Peyroux and Al Green, each covering a Hank Williams original. In addition to Bob Dylan performing “It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue” live in 1975, there’s Elvis Presley‘s fantastic 1966 cover of Dylan’s unreleased gem, “Tomorrow Is A Long Time” and then there’s the stunning supergroup known as The New Basement Tapes who collaborated to complete songs based upon newly uncovered lyrics handwritten by Bob Dylan in 1967 when he was recording with The Band what would come to be known as The Basement Tapes. The New Basement Tapes performance of “Down On The Bottom” features vocals by Jim James (of the band My Morning Jacket), which are incredibly Dylanesque.

You’ll get to hear Bessie Smith‘s  May 26, 1925 recording of “Careless Love” featuring Louis Armstrong (cornet), Fred Longshaw (piano), and Charlie Green (trombone). (I’ve still yet to see the 2015 Dee Rees directed and Queen Latifah starring biopic Bessie, but I did hear it was pretty great.)

I do know that Bessie Smith died in 1937 from injuries in a car accident and was buried in an unmarked grave. In August of 1970 Janis Joplin paid tribute to one of her greatest influences by purchasing a proper tombstone to be erected on Smith’s grave-site. This act of respect and Joplin’s own young demise are the subject of the next tune you’ll hear: Dory Previn’s A Stone for Bessie Smith.” This is followed by Janis Joplin’s lovely take on Richard Rodgers‘ and Lorenz Hart‘s 1935 song “Little Girl Blue.” Joplin’s version appears on my favorite of her albums,  I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama! released on September 11, 1969. I did watch Amy J. Berg’s great (if saddening) 2015 documentary Janis: Little Girl Blue and that I can definitely recommend!

You’ll also hear here on this MixTape two by Bowie, and one of my favorite songs by Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel, “Sebastian.” Self-described by Harley as “possibly a sort of Gothic love song, possibly not: I’m not really sure to be honest,” “Sebastian” is certainly dramatic glam rock, featuring a 50-plus piece orchestra and choir, with orchestral arrangements by Andrew Powell. In 2008 Harley would go on to say:

“It’s poetry. It means what you want it to mean. ‘Sebastian’ is the conduit, the tubes through which I took myself on that journey to write the story. I can’t say for sure, but I wouldn’t have been far away from tripping when I wrote ‘Sebastian.’ LSD, certainly, created so many incidents in your life, so many images, so much madness and mayhem, as well as great tranquility if you were lucky. I can’t define its meaning. It’s like most poetry, it’s a lovely word.”

Yes there’s all this and a whole bunch of other good stuff so go on down and press play !

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:
__The Demise Of The Mask (Vol 10)__Naphthalene Magnolias #28___
  • It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue – Bob Dylan (live Montreal Forum, Canada, December 4, 1975)
  • Down On The Bottom – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, Marcus Mumford, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]
  • Weary Blues – Madeleine Peyroux (Hank Williams cover)
  • Careless Love – Bessie Smith
  • Stone For Bessie Smith – Dory Previn
  • Little Girl Blue – Janis Joplin (written by Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)
  • Rock ‘N’ Roll Suicide – David Bowie (live July 1974)
  • Wild Is The Wind – David Bowie (Nina Simone cover, written by Dimitri Tiomkin and Ned Washington)
  • I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – Al Green (Hank Williams cover)
  • The Gentle Hum Of Anxiety – Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross
  • Feminine Effects – of Montreal (ft. Rebecca Cash)
  • Sebastian – Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel
  • The Rough With The Smooth – Geoff Bastow
  • Miley Tibetan BowlzzzEvil is but a Shadow – Miley Cyrus (ft. The Flaming Lips)
  • Tomorrow Is A Long Time – Elvis Presley (Bob Dylan cover)
  • The Priest – Joni Mitchell
  • As The Orchard Is With RainEarth Has Doors, Let Them Open – Wymond Miles
  • A Reflection (edit) – Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross

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[It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue – Bob Dylan (live Montreal Forum, Canada, December 4, 1975) (photo by Ken Regan)]

[Down On The Bottom – The New Basement Tapes ]

[Weary Blues – Madeleine Peyroux (hank Williams cover)]

[Careless Love – Bessie Smith]

[Stone For Bessie Smith – Dory Previn]

[Little Girl Blue – Janis Joplin (written by Lorenz Hart, Richard Rodgers)]

[Rock ‘N’ Roll Suicide – David Bowie (live July 1974)]

[Wild Is The Wind – David Bowie (photo by Michael Ochs, 1976)]

[I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – Al Green (Hank Williams cover)]

[The Gentle Hum Of Anxiety – Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross (artwork by Rob Sheridan. 2010)]

[Feminine Effects – of Montreal (ft. Rebecca Cash) (photo by Trompe L’oeil Photomagique, 2012)]

[Sebastian – Steve Harley & Cockney Rebel]

[The Rough With The Smooth – Geoff Bastow]

[Miley Tibetan Bowlzzz / Evil is but a Shadow – Miley Cyrus (ft. The Flaming Lips)]

[Tomorrow Is A Long Time – Elvis Presley (Bob Dylan cover)]

[The Priest – Joni Mitchell]

[As The Orchard Is With Rain / Earth Has Doors, Let Them Open – Wymond Miles]

[A Reflection (edit) – Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross]

___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 14)

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig a particular artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

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Being the most up-front pop-oriented of them, if any representatives from the last of the commercial sub-genres listed above were ever to land a hit to temporarily dominate the charts for a season or two then it was likely penned, recorded (and often digitally assembled note-for-note, syllable-by-syllable) by a cabal of nine middle-aged Nordic men. Although their birth certificates stated names that would likely bring to the average American mind images of Vikings or monks, they were typically credited under monikers that were easily forgettable despite their frequent use of the letters Z and X and honorary titles, such as Dr. Cztarlab, Sir LapLux, Mr. Mixus, and Professor JaMeZ. Almost no one would really ever recall these writers’ professional pseudonyms or note the central role they played in the hits that were so pervasive in their lives. These facts of anonymity were by design, as they did not want to interfere with the ascendency and celebrity of the “artist” that was to sell their work to the masses.

Through focus-group brand testing and weeks-long song-writing “cook-outz” where the annual trajectory of a (largely absent) performer’s career could be plotted by the continuity of tunes assigned to them, this committee had perfected a formula for pop familiarity—and thus, top ten hits. Not to oversimplify their equation, but it could be described as so: the forward swirl and bright texture of say, ABBA’s “SOS” but manufactured in a manner that ensured it could effortlessly and cyclically give way to the emphatic gush and catch of an arena-sized shout-along, something akin to the big-rock, chest-thump chorus in Bon Jovi’s “Livin’ On A Prayer.” With these elements married and laid atop a plush bed of programmed beats (or beatz) borrowed from the latest fashions in re-heated Hip Hop and R&B, all that was needed to complete the job was the appropriate vehicle to deliver the song. Sold to a Star-Creation division operating in-house under one of the various record-label executives, the likely hit-song could then be allocated either to a veteran presence or one of the newer recruits from the pop-celebrity academies.

The sound was always bigger & brighter & brighter & bigger. The sound should have little trouble in filling a stadium. Yet, it rarely needed to fill a stadium, but the sound must fill a shopping complex daily. Yes, the genuine smash hit was truly achieved when it facilitated an easy browse along the aisles of capitalism—interrupting consumption only long enough for an involuntary duet between pop star and shopper, a reflex response from the teaser tinsel of the pre-chorus build and the persistent bass and treble hook of the chorus returning again and returning again. At times the production could be so seamless, so unremarkable, so successful that one could pause and ask themselves: How do I know this song? Have I always known it? Has this song always been here?

With these narrow options before her, what was a girl to listen to? There was the feminine powerhouses of the Divas; at least they were aggressively advertised as such. These “Queens” and “Ladies” were always presented in context to the objects in their orbits: the relationships new or sour; the clothes; the hair; the promotional tie-Ins; the prop outrage performed on an award ceremony stage; the boyfriends and husbands; their current positions on the charts; their current positions in the rotating feuds between the other Divas. Watching music videos one day after school with her best friend since ninth grade, Rebecca turned to her and said: “Ugh, these role-model bitches are always either selling church or snatch.” Mireille laughed until she snorted. It was true, those who were not peddling their brand with the accompanying image of Clean American could be found rolling their eyes, spreading their legs, and retailing their lives under a banner that read Liberated & Nasty. Purchased from the Nordic committee, they all currently had the pull of a melody that was so easy to babble-along to. The Divas’ singles could be fun, but listening to them, Mireille reasoned, would make her feel like merely some consequence of a premise.

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dendrites_cvr_14

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Water or Bread (Raining) – Madlib

Metamorphosis – Miles Okazaki (w/ Dan Weiss, Christof Knoche, Jon Flaugher, Miguel Zenon, David Binney, and Chris Potter)

To Sheila – Smashing Pumpkins [photo by Yelena Yemchuk]

Sonic Armada – Air

Morning Fog – Danger Mouse & Daniele Luppi

Green Belly – Ty Segall

Hidee Hidee Ho #16 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, Marcus Mumford, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]

Shaman’s Blues – The Doors (Jim Morrison in the closet of his room at LA’s Chateau Marmont hotel, by Art Kane, May 1968.) 

Paint a Lady – Susan Christie

Strawberry Wine – Ryan Adams [photo by Mark Seliger]

Crystals – Bennie Maupin

Synthesizer – Outkast (ft. George Clinton)

What I saw – Broadcast & The Focus Group

Twinkle/Master Teacher – Erykah Badu [photo by Timothy Saccenti, 2008]

Polly – Duke Ellington

The Silent Orchestra – Hamilton Leithauser

sinatra

I See Your Face Before Me – Frank Sinatra

Hidee Hidee Ho #11 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Jim James, Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Marcus Mumford, Bo Koster, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]

Stay (Faraway, So Close!) – U2

Homme Lune – Air

Black Noise – Rotary Connection

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 14)

  • Water or Bread (Raining) – Madlib
  • Metamorphosis – Miles Okazaki (w/ Dan Weiss, Christof Knoche, Jon Flaugher, Miguel Zenon, David Binney, and Chris Potter)
  • To Sheila – Smashing Pumpkins
  • Sonic Armada – Air
  • Morning Fog – Danger Mouse & Daniele Luppi
  • Green Belly – Ty Segall
  • Hidee Hidee Ho #16 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, Marcus Mumford, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]
  • Shaman’s Blues – The Doors
  • Paint a Lady – Susan Christie
  • Strawberry Wine – Ryan Adams 
  • Crystals – Bennie Maupin
  • Synthesizer – Outkast (ft. George Clinton)
  • What I saw – Broadcast & The Focus Group
  • Twinkle/Master Teacher – Erykah Badu 
  • Polly – Duke Ellington
  • The Silent Orchestra – Hamilton Leithauser
  • I See Your Face Before Me – Frank Sinatra
  • Hidee Hidee Ho #11 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Jim James, Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith,  Marcus Mumford, Bo Koster, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]
  • Stay (Faraway, So Close!) – U2
  • Homme Lune – Air
  • Black Noise – Rotary Connection

<^>_ _ _ __=========================================     ______BOBBY CALERO

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig a particular artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: —- —– – – — — — – — – – POOR MAN’S TRINKETS

Poor Man's Trinkets

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TRUEDT

Hello All,

This post was to be a sort of continuation of the easy-breezy opiate sounds featured on the last MixTape, Easter Censer, but that will simply have to wait, as today I present to you my own take on “Fan-Fiction.” Having just recently finished binge-watching the first season of the HBO series True Detective, I was, to put it lightly, completely impressed.

Through and thru these eight episodes are a work of art: the subtle yet skillfully complicated performances by all the actors and the chemistry between them (particularly, it goes without mention, from Matthew McConaughey and Woody Harrelson); The sensitive exploration of certain facets of the human-condition through writer Nic Pizzolatto’s narrative structure and dialogue; and of course the exquisite revenants that are the visuals provided by director Cary Joji Fukunaga and cinematographer Adam Arkapaw–the scenes are phosphorescent in their putridity.

True-Detective

However, another element of the show that netted me immediately was the soundtrack; particularly in the first episode with the use of a long-loved-by-me Freewheelin’ outtake by Dylan called “Rocks and Gravel” in a scene where Cohle speaks with the gaming girls at a truck stop bar. I was not surprised to find out afterwards that the man responsible for the music selections is none other than T Bone Burnett.

Along with being a fantastic musician, producer, and songwriter himself, the man has made an award-winning career out of having exceptional taste in music, an intuition for adding depth, and tact when creating the appropriate atmosphere.

Throughout the whole series Burnett’s selections are perfection; none more so though than with his choice of closing episode seven with the haunted tone of Townes Van Zandt‘s austere “Lungs.” The song arrives like a sharp blade through brambles: full of purpose even as it drives on ahead into mystery and sorrow.

Well, won’t you lend your lungs to me?
Mine are collapsin’
Plant my feet and bitterly breathe
Up the time that’s passin’

Breath I’ll take and breath I’ll give
And pray the day is not poisoned
Stand among the ones that live
In lonely indecision

Well, fingers walk the darkness down
Mind is on the midnight
Gather up the gold you’ve found
You fool it’s only moonlight

If you stop to take it home
Your hands will turn to butter
You better leave this dream alone
Try to find another

Salvation sat and crossed herself
Called the devil partner
Wisdom burned upon a shelf
Who’ll kill the raging cancer

Seal the river at its mouth
Take the water prisoner
Fill the sky with screams and cries
Bathe in fiery answers

Well, Jesus was an only son
And love his only concept
The strangers cry in foreign tongues
And dirty up the doorstep

And I for one, and you for two
Ain’t got the time for outside
Keep your injured looks to you
We’ll tell the world that we tried

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So, as I said, here’s my version of Fan-Fiction, which owes its inspiration to the work of T Bone Burnett on True Detective as much as it does to anyone else. I invite you to imagine your own scenes and narratives to these tunes.

To my mind this MixTape, Poor Man’s Trinkets, is the soundtrack to a lost episode buried somewhere within the seventh of the actual series. This would be one where Detectives Rust Cohle and Marty Hart rework the murder of Dora Lange from scratch, and thus are forced to revisit once again their own personal histories as well. Admittedly, this recapitulation of the entire series thus far wouldn’t make for very exciting television but through the filter and tension of atmospherics (and car-ride conversations through Richard Misrach‘s “Petrochemical America) it could further explore the show’s central yet elusive themes of patriarchy and its inheritance; the cyclical nature of existence; perceptions of manhood and responsibility; the art and guile involved in all forms of storytelling; companionship and male friendship; and the presence of Grace. This mix also corrects what I saw as the one flaw in Burnett’s work—not including anything by Mark Lanegan (because pretty much anything off of Bubblegum would’ve worked beautifully).

If nothing else, in my opinion, my mix makes for a pretty great soundtrack, no?

Well, as always –Enjoy Yourself—

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Poor Man's Trinkets

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS

 

POOR MAN’S TRINKETS (True Detective Fan-Fiction Episode 7.5)

 

  • The Gulf Of Mexico [snippet] – Steve Earle
  • The Lord Is in This Place…How Dreadful Is This Place – Fairport Convention
  • This Wheel’s On Fire – Atlas Sound
  • Mr. Mudd And Mr. Gold – Steve Earle (ft. Justin Townes Earle)
  • Werewolf Heart – Dead Man’s Bones
  • Cold Criminals – Pink Mountaintops
  • Milk Cow’s Calf’s Blues – Bob Dylan
  • Rake – Alela Diane (ft. Alina Hardin)
  • On My Way To Heaven – Staple Singers
  • Will The Circle Be Unbroken – U.S. Apple Corps.
  • Wedding Dress – Mark Lanegan
  • Get Back Satan – Rev. Roger L. Worthy & Bonnie Woodstock
  • Raised Right Men – Tom Waits
  • Golden Earrings – Peggy Lee
  • Mean Old World [edit] – The Heavenly Gospel Singers
  • You’re Goin’ Miss Your Candyman – Terry Callier
  • I’m So Lonesome I Could Cry – Steve Young (X-Mas Eve 1975 Ensemble version)
  • I Would Love You – Father John Misty & Phosphorescent
  • Waitin’ ‘Round To Die – Townes Van Zandt
  • Angels Laid Him Away – Lucinda Williams
  • Aphid Manure Heist – Beck
  • All Along The Watchtower – The Brothers & Sisters
  • Sleep With Me/Sleep With Me (Version) – Mark Lanegan
  • Lucifer Rising Part IV – Bobby Beausoleil
  • This Wheel’s On Fire – Bob Dylan & The Band

————————————BOBBY CALERO—————————————