Category Archives: The Walkmen

A.M.O.P. PRESENTS: OPEN BOXES (VOL. 2)

++++++++++[>+++++++>++++++++++>+++>+<<<<-]

++.>+.+++++++..+++.>++.<<+++++++++++++++.>.+++.——.——–.>+.>.

____________———-___=

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

—  –   ————-______________ ->

Hello All! Hello World!

This here mix features two songs from Walter Martin‘s two fantastic records of children’s music (2014’s We’re All Young Together and 2017’s My Kinda Music). Martin was the multi-instrumentalist from what just might be my favorite “NY” band, The Walkmen (I’ve seen them live at least a dozen times) and these “family albums” of his are a real joy to listen to.

You’ll also hear two from the newest and likely last record by Richard Swift, as sadly he died this past July 3rd from complications due to alcohol addiction. This stunning album was released on September 20th, a date that would have marked his and his wife’s 21st wedding anniversary.

Richard Swift was only 41 but he had already amassed an incredible and diverse body of work; sadly he leaves behind as well a wife and three daughters.

I paid tribute to his genius with a mix of his songs in August.

I believe the two songs featured here–the title track “The Hex” and “Dirty Jim“–are more fine examples of what made so much of his art so brilliant: it could be both incredibly playful and yet devastatingly heartbreaking, simultaneously. Take “Dirty Jim” with it’s lovely, jaunty bounce, but despite this ebullient ragtime melody it can twist your guts and that jaunt turns to substance-abused jitters with lines like: “Every daughter in my home, every one I’ve left alone/ Sorry for the tears I gave to you.”

I’ve always admired a man that can take pathos and mutate it into POP.

Somewhat in the same dolorous mode, the closing track “Lullaby” by Rhiannon Giddens backed by the Kronos Quartet seems so sweet and easy until you begin to understand the heartsore and shameful relationships being presented to you. I really believe Rhiannon Giddens is one of the best things American music has going for it these days.

In addition to its hints of slavery and more modern racial tensions this berceuse also brought to my mind how the poet Oliver Wendell Holmes suggested in 1872 that the cuckoo bird replace the bald eagle as the emblem of the United States of America, writing:

“We Americans are all cuckoos. We make our homes in the nests of other birds,”

In his 2011 book The Old, Weird America (originally released with the title, Invisible Republic) music journalist and cultural critic Greil Marcus expanded upon Holmes’ thought:

“We Americans are all cuckoos,” Oliver Wendell Holmes said in 1872. “We make our homes in the nests of other birds.” This is the starting point.
As long as seven hundred years ago,the English were singing that the cuckoo heralded the coming of summer, and yet the bird was hated. Its cry was reviled through the centuries as oppressive, repetitious, maniacally boring, a cry to drive you crazy, a cry that was already crazy, benefiting a bird that was insane. The cuckoo–the true, “parasitic” cuckoo, which despite Holmes’ choice of it for national bird is not found in the United States–lays its eggs in the nests of other birds. It is a kind of scavenger in reverse: violating the natural order of things, it is by its own nature an outsider, a creature that cannot belong. Depositing its orphans, leaving its progeny to be raised by others, to grow up as impostors in another’s house–as America filled itself up with slaves, indentured servants, convicts, hustlers, adventurers, the ambitious and the greedy, the fleeing and the hated, who took or were given new, impostors’ names–the cuckoo becomes the other and sees all other creatures as other. If the host bird removes a cuckoo’s egg from its nest, the cuckoo may take revenge, killing all of the host’s eggs or chicks; in the same manner, as new Americans drove out or exterminated the Indians, when the cuckoo egg hatches the newborn may drive out any other nestlings or destroy any other eggs. As a creature alienated from its own nature,the cuckoo serves as the specter of the alienation of each from all.
[…]
Here is a mystical body of the republic, a kind of public secret: a declaration of what sort of wishes and fears lie behind any public act, a declaration of a weird but clearly recognizable America within the America of the exercise of institutional majoritarian power. […] Here everyone calls upon the will and everyone believes in fate. It is a democracy of manners–a democracy, finally, of how people carry themselves, of how they appear in public. The ruling question of public life is not that of the distribution of material goods or the governance of moral affairs, but that of how people plumb their souls and then present their discoveries, their true selves, to others–unless, as happens here often enough, the fear of not belonging, or the wish for true proof that one does belong, takes over, and people assume the mask that makes them indistinguishable from anyone else. But [here] that mask never stays on for long.
God reigns here, but his rule can be refused. His gaze cannot be escaped; his hand, maybe. You can bet: you can stake a probably real exile on a probably imaginary homecoming. Or you can take yourself out of the game, and wait for a death God will ignore; then you, like so many others, already dead but still speaking, will take your place in the bend of a note in “The Coo Coo Bird.” It’s limbo, but it’s not bad: on the fourth day of July you get to holler.

OK, I assure you it’s not all sadness on the mix nor a visit to Norton Juster’s The Doldrums.

[some of the landscape of The Doldrums, inhabited by the Lethargarians, as depicted in animation legend Chuck Jones’ 1968 adaption of Juster’s 1961 children’s book The Phantom Tollbooth.

 No, not at all. There’s Jack White with a song that sounds like it could have been assembled by Malcolm McLaren in the 80s.
.
There’s Judee Sill with one of her sweet sounding folk-tunes soaked in and thirsty for Christian mysticism; she categorized her own style of music as “country cult baroque.” 
.
There’s a pretty diddy off of Uruguayan singer-songwriter Juan Wauters‘ 2014 record North American Poetry. I recall reading somewhere Wauters’ music described as alegría melancólica (melancholy joy) and that is an apt description of the mood that colors a good deal of his songs, which are delivered in silly little knots. Just as in modern times “silly” is a mode or attribute of this bizarre, aggregate thing we are that is often all too easily denigrated and dismissed, in my world “silly” is one of the highest compliments I can give. As a culture we really need to relearn how to truly be at play beside the tower.

You’ll hear something fun from Bobby Charles‘ eponymous 1972 record. Charles first made a name for himself back in the mid-1950s  when he wrote the songs “See You Later, Alligator” (becoming a hit for Bill Haley and His Comets), and “Walking to New Orleans” (becoming a hit for Fats Domino).

There’s something from the sole album by P, a short lived project involving Johnny Depp, front-man of the band Butthole Surfers Gibby Haynes, and others like Flea of Red Hot Chili Peppers. This album is in fact the first CD I ever purchased through the miraculous finding machine known as the “internets.”

There’s something from Canadian composer Doug Randle off his 1971 LP Songs For The New Industrial State. This whole bizarre, jingle-like record seems like something that would have been released in the world set-up in Robert Downey Sr.‘s cinematic masterpiece Putney Swope.

Oh and despite the opening title in the sequence of “Mexican Loneliness” to “March Of The Swivelheads,” this is a segue I first committed to cassette tape back in 1997 and 21 years later it still makes me both give a smug chuckle at my own cleverness and want to play hookie.

so please press play and…

 

____________———-___=========================================  __=

—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

—  –   ————-______________ ->

_________———

== =   = =  __  _

== =   = =  __  _
A.M.O.P. Presents: __Open Boxes (Vol. 2)
  • Child, the Man Said – Walter Martin
  • The Hex – Richard Swift 
  • The Lamb Ran Away With The Crown – Judee Sill
  • Mexican Loneliness – written by Jack Kerouac; performed by Matt Dillon with Joey Altruda, Joe Gonzalez & Pablo Calogero
  • March Of The Swivelheads – The English Beat
  • Street People – Bobby Charles
  • What Was It You Wanted – Bettye LaVette (Bob Dylan cover)
  • Make Love On The Wing II – Nico Fidenco
  • Me, Marlon Brando, Marlon Brando And I – R.E.M.
  • Michael Stipe – P (Gibby Haynes, Johnny Depp, Sal Jenco, Bill Carter, Flea)
  • Living Well Is The Best Revenge – R.E.M.
  • Escucho Mucho – Juan Wauters
  • That’s Life – James Brown (written by Dean Kay and Kelly Gordon)
  • Who Scared You – The Doors
  • Shut Paranoia – The Fine Machine (Oscar Lindok, aka Giacomo Dell’Orso; Proluton, aka Gianni Dell’Orso; Peter Donimak, aka Nico Fidenco; and Edda Dell’Orso)
  • Dirty Jim – Richard Swift 
  • Steam Heat – Barbara Moore
  • Vive la Company – Doug Randle
  • Corporation – Jack White
  • What We Gained In The Fire – The Mynabirds (produced by Richard Swift)
  • If I Were a Tiger – Walter Martin feat. Milan McAlevey, Nina Dhongia
  • Lullaby – Kronos Quartet & Rhiannon Giddens

 

  • ================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  _

—————————————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  __  _

___    ______________—————__\

Child, the Man Said – Walter Martin

The Hex – Richard Swift

The Lamb Ran Away With The Crown – Judee Sill

Mexican Lonelieness – written by Jack Kerouac; performed by Matt Dillon With Joey Altruda, Joe Gonzalez & Pablo Calogero [photo by Michael Muller]

March Of The Swivelheads – The English Beat

Street People – Bobby Charles [photo by Michael Ochs, 1972]

What Was It You Wanted – Bettye LaVette (Bob Dylan cover)

Make Love On The Wing II – Nico Fidenco

Me, Marlon Brando, Marlon Brando And I – R.E.M. [Marlon Brando, 1948, photo by Ronny Jaques]

Michael Stipe – P (Gibby Haynes, Johnny Depp, Sal Jenco, Bill Carter, Flea)

Living Well Is The Best Revenge – R.E.M.

Escucho Mucho – Juan Wauters

That’s Life – James Brown (written by Dean Kay and Kelly Gordon)

Who Scared You – The Doors [Morrison in the closet of his room at LA’s Chateau Marmont hotel, May 1968, (photo by Art Kane).]

Shut Paranoia – The Fine Machine (Oscar Lindok, aka Giacomo Dell’Orso; Proluton, aka Gianni Dell’Orso; Peter Donimak, aka Nico Fidenco; and Edda Dell’Orso)

Dirty Jim – Richard Swift [photo by Richard Swift, Sept 5 2016]

Steam Heat – Barbara Moore

Vive la Company – Doug Randle

What We Gained In The Fire – The Mynabirds (produced by Richard Swift)

If I Were a Tiger – Walter Martin feat. Milan McAlevey, Nina Dhongia

Lullaby – Kronos Quartet & Rhiannon Giddens

___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

THE DEMISE OF THE MASK (VOL. 8)__Bread & Circus ___

__

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

____________———-___=

—  –   ————-______________ ->

demise_cvr_8

__________———

—————————————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  __  _
__________—

Hello All.

Welcome to Volume Eight of the MixTape series: The Demise Of The Mask. –(Volume One here)__(Volume Two here)__(Volume Three here)__(Volume Four here)__(Volume Five here)__(Volume Six here)__(Volume Seven here)-

I’ve got quite a treat MixTape here for you as this one features a triple-play by Hamilton Leithauser: first there’s “We Can’t Be Beat” from the last album by his always fantastic group The Walkmen, 2012’s Heaven; then there’s a selection from Leithauser’s 2014 debut solo studio album, Black Hours; and finally there’s the song “When The Truth Is…” from last year’s stunning record I Had a Dream That You Were Mine, which is a collaborative work with Rostam Batmanglij (the former multi-instrumentalist and producer of Vampire Weekend).

You’ll also hear Aretha Franklin, some Beastie Boys, the lovely “Rainbows In Gasoline” by the duo of Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl who record together under the moniker of The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (or GOASTT), and a fine example of why John Lennon was one of the greatest of rock ‘n’ roll vocalists with The Beatles‘ tune “All I’ve Got To Do.”

As well, there are two selections from the Parliament-Funkadelic collective: first there’s a cover of The Beatles by incendiary yet so sweet guitarist Eddie Hazel from his 1977 solo debut Game, Dames and Guitar Thangs, which features incredible vocals by The Brides of Funkenstein (the duo of Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry, who prior to joining the P-Funk collective were members of Sly and the Family Stone); later on you’ll catch the revolving, kaleidoscopic groove of “Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication” from Parliament‘s 1975 masterpiece, Mothership Connection.

Oh and I can’t forget to mention the rendition of Magic Sam‘s All Of Your Love” done with grit and precision by The Rolling Stones and taken from their joyous record of blues covers released at the end of last year, Blue & Lonesome.

Among a whole bunch of other great sounds this mix also features two figures who are perhaps the most poetic recording artists of Uruguayan music: Jaime Roos and Eduardo Mateo. The song “Viviendo” is from Roos’ third record, Aquello released in 1981. There is a translation done by my father below for those that are interested:

Viviendo (Living) by Jaime Roos [translated by Julio Calero]
I remember you
You’re the One
Who could understand  it
No big deal
That we do not love each other
You could understand it
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
You’ll find me
Living
.
You’ll hear
The world was
And will be a marvel, I already know
It could be
My voice
Coming out of a nightmare that’s gone
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
where abouts may you be?
Living
Alone, perhaps
Living

Throughout his long career Jaime Roos has continued to make an interesting mix of rock and folk with the more traditional sounds of Uruguay like candombe, milonga, tango and murga. He’s still out there performing and I highly recommend that if you ever have the opportunity you should definitely catch his show!

 Eduardo Mateo‘s “Niña” is a sweet tune done by a pure musician, and its recording comes with an interesting story. By the time Mateo’s phenomenal band El Kinto had officially disintegrated in the early part of 1970 most of Mateo’s friends and associates were already convinced that he had gone completely insane. Despite the fact that these same people viewed him as a musical genius, they did not know what to make of his habits of disappearing for days at a time, either to lock himself up somewhere in a rented room to explore new realms on his instrument while searching for spiritual enlightenment through chemicals, or to wander the streets with nothing but pajamas and a guitar—there was always a guitar, a rare constant in this man’s unhinged life. Once, my uncle saw him walking the streets at night with one foot aligned with the curb, the other with the gutter, so that he was forced to maintain an awkward and drastic limp to his gait—how’s that for a metaphor?!

Speaking of this period in Mateo’s life, Uruguayan singer Verónica Indart had this story to tell:

“The last time I saw him was in the first years of the 1970s. I was

with Héctor, my husband, and Mateo arrived. He entered, he took

up the guitar, and he sat down to play by the window, looking at the

sea for a long while. We listened to him. When he finished, he got up,

he set down the guitar and he went out the door without a greeting.

That was Mateo. He arrived, gave us his music and went on without

greeting us, because it was not necessary” (Lion Production, 2006).

In 1971, for those who were fortunate to have heard Mateo play there was no doubt of that man’s overwhelming talent—mental illness or not; however, beyond a handful of tracks there existed little recorded evidence of it. This would soon change due to the influence of talented singer Diane Denoir, and through the dedication and passion of producer Carlos Píriz. Píriz, a recording technician who had worked for the live, music television show Discodromo had recently started the record label De la Planta along with Jorge “Coyo” Abuchalja, guitarist for the group Los Delfines. The ethos behind this venture was to maintain a Uruguayan label that was dedicated to Uruguayan musicians, providing them with better production, recording techniques, and better distribution than the then norm. Fortunately, through Píriz’s connections, they were able to secure regular studio time at ION Studios in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the recording technology was far superior to that found in their native country (four tracks as opposed to two at most, for example).

In October of 1971 one such artist they chose to present to the public was the singer Diane Denoir. As she was recording a fair amount of Mateo’s material for her De la Planta debut, she felt it was only appropriate that the artist himself accompany her on some of the tracks. Having convinced Mateo to take the trip, Píriz quickly took advantage of the rare opportunity by persuading him to stay and record a solo LP for the label. However, in spite of Píriz’s optimistic plans to complete the recording in one week, he soon found that dealing with this erratic artist would be an ultimate test of endurance and patience.

The sessions went like this: Mateo had an alphabetic notebook,

and stuck in each page he had bar napkins upon which his songs

were written. If he knew the first letter of the title of the song he

wished to play, he would find the correct napkin, which would help

him remember the melody, so that he could recreate the original idea

he had envisioned when he had composed the song in the first place.

Remembering the songs was only the first obstacle […]. Mateo

would record songs one day, and erase them the next. “The first day

he recorded three or four things,” Píriz recalled. “The following day

he came in and said, ‘erase them. For Mateo, they are all wrong.’

We erased them. And that process of erasing the previous day’s work

continued for four or five days. At that moment, I understood that this

would be the system for the whole disc […]. I decided that I will be the

person who says what was well-recorded, or not, and I began to keep

all the material.”

On other days, Mateo went to ION studios only to say that he was not

inspired, and would return the next day. Then there were the days that

he appeared at the studio, and asked, “What time do we record tomorrow?”

“The same as today, at four o’clock,” Píriz would say. “Okay I am going,

until tomorrow,” was Mateo’s only reply (Lion Production, 2006).

 –

This whole arduous process continued for two months, until one day when Mateo said to the producer that he was stepping out of the studio to buy a pack of cigarettes, and never came back. He had returned to his streets in Montevideo. Píriz was left holding hours of recordings of these fragmented sessions—the only proof that Mateo had even been there. A labor of love, Píriz would then spend the better part of a year assembling these into the album that would be released in December of 1972: Mateo Solo Bien Se Lame.

One of the thirteen brilliant compositions that Píriz extracted from the chaos is the twisted beauty that is “Niña.” Through his dedication, Píriz was able to capture on this record the complex sensitivity of this troubled artist. Seeing as how, other than a rare background vocal here and there, Mateo created every sound on this album himself, his essence truly shines through each composition. There is a translation of the lyrics done by me below:

Niña (Little Girl) by Eduardo Mateo [translated by Bobby Calero]
Little girl that always has a light
showing you what you do not want.
Do not fear the birds
if they say your life with their trills.
It should be that you understand;
that’s why what comes next is what has gone.
Always in a white dress,
you go but beware;
The devils in the guise of angels
will notice you talking.
Does it shame you that you don’t care
what has been soiled?
Yuu…yu-le-lé yu-lé.
__

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

____________———-___=========================================  __=

—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

—  –   ————-______________ ->

demise_cvr_8

__________———

—————————————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  __  _
__________—
A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:
__The Demise Of The Mask (Vol 8)__Bread & Circus ___
  • Pick Pocket – Andy Votel
  • I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)
  • All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles
  • Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin
  • Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions
  • Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
  • Been & Gone – Annette Peacock
  • Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs
  • I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers
  • Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra
  • Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament
  • Kissing My Love – Afrique
  • Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys
  • All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover)
  • Viviendo – Jaime Roos
  • We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen
  • Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser
  • When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam
  • Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger
  • Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader
  • Niña – Eduardo Mateo
—————————————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  __  
bread-circus-1
bread-circus-2
__________—
___    ______________—————__
[Pick Pocket - Andy Votel]

[Pick Pocket – Andy Votel]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots (photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
(photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[We Can't Be Beat - The Walkmen]

[We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

.
__________——————– =__^__=___________________———
___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: Jürgen’s Haber-X-Mas Mix

MERRY CHRISTMAS,

Here’s a present I slapped together at the last minute for you all:

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: Jürgen’s Haber-X-Mas Mix

———–(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)————–

  • Cosmic Christmas – The Rolling Stones
  • Oh Come All Ye Faithful – Johnny Cash
  • Merry Christmas Baby – Ike and Tina Turner
  • Jingle Bells – Jackson Chorale
  • Merry Christmas Baby – Soulful Strings
  • Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas – Scott Weiland
  • Silent Night – Elvis Presley
  • Silent Night – Huey Piano Smith & The Clowns
  • Funky Little Drummer Boy – Bobby Holloway
  • Little Drummer boy – Bing Crosby & David Bowie
  • Little Drummer boy – The Dandy Warhols
  • Santa Claus Go Straight To the Ghetto – James Brown
  • Frosty The Snowman – The Jackson 5
  • I Wish It Was Christmas Today – Julian Casablancas
  • Christmas Party (feat. Nicole Sheahan) – The Walkmen
  • Let It Snow! – Julian Koster
  • Merry Christmas Baby – Charles Brown
  • Jesus Is – 2nd Chapter of Acts
  • Last Christmas – The Puppini Sisters
  • Santa Claus – The Sonics
  • O Little Town of Bethlehem – Elvis Presley
  • I Saw Mommy Kissing Santa Claus – The Jackson 5
  • Santa Bring My Baby Back (To Me) – Elvis Presley
  • Santa Bring My Baby Back – The Reverend Horton Heat
  • White Christmas – Beck
  • Christmas Time Will Soon Be Over – Jack White

LET YOUR HEART BE LIGHT & TO ALL A GOODNIGHT!

——————–BOBBY CALERO—————–

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: 2 01 2

Hello All,

If you’re anything like me then you like to let music marinate in your guts for a bit before finding a place for it on the shelf. So, even though I feel that this might be a bit premature on my part but with the year of 2013 rapidly approaching its conclusion, I’d like to present a MixTape that collects many of my favorite tunes from 2012.

Oh, and I’m sure that it might seem like an oversight on my part but this mix does not include the trackAbove My Ground” by Landlady, even though I stated before that it was just about the best new song I heard that year. Seeing as it has already been featured in its very own post I figured I’d give some other choice tunes a chance to shine here on this mixtape.

However, here’s the video for what is still my favorite song of 2012:

I must say, however, that I believe my top 3 albums for that year are:

Fear Fun by Father John Misty

Tempest by Bob Dylan

The Idler Wheel Is Wiser Than the Driver of the Screw and Whipping Cords Will Serve You More Than Ropes Will Ever Do by Fiona Apple

—Enjoy Yourself

2012 AMOP

—————(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD) —————

A Mouthful Of Pennies Presents: 2 01 2

  • Daredevil – Fiona Apple
  • Reel to Reel – Damien Jurado (feat. Richard Swift)
  • No One Ever Sleeps – The Walkmen
  • I Guess I Should Go To Sleep – Jack White
  • I Just Started Hating Some People Today – Beck (Feat. Jack White)
  • Well They’re Gone – The Dandy Warhols
  • Walking Up To Hand Grenades – The Brian Jonestown Massacre
  • Who’s Gonna Lite It Up – Cornershop (feat. Izzy Lindqwister)
  • I’m Writing A Novel – Father John Misty
  • Early Roman Kings – Bob Dylan
  • Eleggua – Dr. John
  • Dirt, Money & Friends – BLKHRTS
  • Feedin’ Birds – Gonjasufi
  • Slo-Mo-Tion/Overneath The Path Of Misery [snippet]- Marilyn Manson
  • Express Yourself – Diplo (feat. Nicky Da B)
  • Default – Atoms for Peace
  • Terrifying [Starlight & Wonder Version] – Pop Levi
  • A Queens Story – Nas
  • Montauk – Rufus Wainwright
  • I Am What I Am – Spiritualized
  • I Only Have Eyes For You [snippet] – Beck

———————————–  —        —–  —       –  –        –       ———-

Daredevil – Fiona Apple

Reel to Reel – Damien Jurado (feat. Richard Swift)

No One Ever Sleeps – The Walkmen

I Guess I Should Go To Sleep – Jack White

I Just Started Hating Some People Today – Beck (feat. Jack White)

Well They’re Gone – The Dandy Warhols

Walking Up To Hand Grenades – The Brian Jonestown Massacre

Who’s Gonna Lite It Up – Cornershop (feat. Izzy Lindqwister)

I’m Writing A Novel – Father John Misty

Early Roman Kings – Bob Dylan

Eleggua – Dr. John

Dirt, Money & Friends – BLKHRTS

Feedin’ Birds – Gonjasufi

Slo-Mo-Tion/Overneath The Path Of Misery [snippet]- Marilyn Manson

Express Yourself – Diplo (feat. Nicky Da B)

Default – Atoms for Peace

Terrifying [Starlight & Wonder Version] – Pop Levi

A Queens Story – Nas

Montauk – Rufus Wainwright

I Am What I Am – Spiritualized

I Only Have Eyes For You [snippet] – Beck

ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS IS JEWS (or to be Jewish, rather).

Don’t get me wrong, I love Xmas as much as much as the next guy, but there’s certain elements to this season that seem to heighten anxiety, and the days seem to pass in rapid succession. At moments, it can leave you feeling as awkward as a child walking in on Santa Claus making it with mom. Sometimes it just looks like it might be easier if it wasn’t one of “my” days.

So, here are two tracks that (along with Rum from my cousin Paul) help ease me into the Christmas Spirit:

Like it? Buy it.

Huey and his crew, “The Clowns,” hammered out this holiday record in their distinctive New Orleans style R&B in 1962. In fact, it was so distinct that it was soon withdrawn due to outraged reactions, which called the rocking treatment of these sacred tunes sacrilegious (Heer, n.d.).

Christmas Party (feat. Nicole Sheahan)————-Click To Listen

In 2004, NYC’s (although I believe now they live in Philly) The Walkmen dropped their special Christmas Party 7″, EP. Here you’ve got guest Nicole Sheahan helping out on vocals. This one just makes me laugh, in a sentimental way.

Well, Merry Christmas to All, and to All a Goodnight!

Peace On Earth,

Bobby

Ref:

Heer, D. (n.d.). Huey “Piano” Smith. Blackcat Rockabilly Europe. Retrieved on December 24th at http://www.rockabilly.nl/references/messages/huey_piano_smith.htm

Martin, W. (2004). The Christmas Party [recorded by The Walkmen] On The Christmas Party. [7” Vinyl]. Record Collection. (2004)

Mohr & Gruber. Silent Night [recorded by Huey ‘Piano’ Smith & The Clowns] On ‘Twas the Night Before Christmas. [CD] Westside. (1962/1998)