Category Archives: Cal Tjader

A.M.O.P. PRESENTS__[A CRUSH OF CURTAINS]:

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Hello All.

Welcome to A Mouthful Of Pennies! This here MixTape [A CRUSH OF CURTAINS]: is the soundtrack to a film that screened in my skull. __Well I do hope you dig it all and if you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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__A..M.O.P. Presents:__[A Crush Of Curtains]:

  • Mr. Bumble – Sunforest
  • I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight – Brothers & Sisters (Dylan cover)
  • Why Don’t You Do Right? – Cal Tjader Feat. Mary Stallings (written by Joseph “Kansas Joe” McCoy)
  • Another Man’s Vine – Tom Waits
  • Open The Door [Skeleton Key Version] – Otis Redding
  • Open The Door, Homer – Bob Dylan & The Band (take 1; The Basement Tapes)
  • Love In Vain – The Rolling Stones (Robert Johnson cover)
  • Cry One More Time – Gram Parsons (J. Geils Band cover)
  • Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye – Bettye Swann (The Casinos cover; written by John D. Loudermilk)
  • Drifter’s Escape – Joan Baez (Dylan cover)
  • Red Walls – crush_DLX (Pop Levi & Bunny Holiday)
  • Stopover Bombay – Alice Coltrane; ft. Pharoah Sanders
  • Lonely Little G-String – Sonny Lester & His Orchestra
  • Clang Boom Steam / Make It Rain – Tom Waits
  • Star Eyes (I Can’t Catch It) – Danger Mouse & Sparklehorse Feat. David Lynch
  • Open The Door Homer – Bob Dylan & The Band (take 2; The Basement Tapes)
  • Wicked Messenger – Bob Dylan
  • Raven – Karen Elson
  • Speak Low – Lotte Lenya (written by Kurt Weill & Ogden Nash; from Broadway musical One Touch of Venus (1943))
  • You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had – Muddy Waters; ft. Otis Spann on piano, Francis Clay on drums, Willie Dixon on bass, and some combination of Sammy Lawhorn, Pee Wee Madison, and Buddy Guy (on acoustic) on guitar.)
  • The Perfect Drug – Nine Inch Nails
  • Karmacoma – Massive Attack; ft. Tricky
  • Sweet & Pungent – Duke Ellington
  • Overcome – Tricky; ft.  Martina Topley-Bird 
  • Benjamin – Steven Bernstein
  • Altarwise By Owl Light (1st Verse) / A Pair Of Doves – Dylan Thomas / Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross
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[Mr. Bumble – Sunforest]

[I’ll Be Your Baby Tonight – Brothers & Sisters (Dylan cover)]

[Why Don’t You Do Right? – Cal Tjader Feat. Mary Stallings (written by Joseph “Kansas Joe” McCoy)]

[Another Man’s Vine – Tom Waits]

[Open The Door [Skeleton Key Version] – Otis Redding]

[Open The Door, Homer – Bob Dylan & The Band (take 1; The Basement Tapes)]

[Love In Vain – The Rolling Stones (Robert Johnson cover)]

(Cry One More Time – Gram Parsons (J. Geils Band cover)]

[Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye – Bettye Swann (The Casinos cover; written by John D. Loudermilk)]

[Drifter’s Escape – Joan Baez (Dylan cover)]

[Red Walls – crush_DLX (Pop Levi & Bunny Holiday)]

[Stopover Bombay – Alice Coltrane; ft. Pharoah Sanders]

[Lonely Little G-String – Sonny Lester & His Orchestra]

[Clang Boom Steam / Make It Rain – Tom Waits (photo by Anton Corbijn, 2004)]

[Star Eyes (I Can’t Catch It) – Danger Mouse & Sparklehorse Feat. David Lynch (Dark Night of the Soul Photography by David Lynch )]

[Open The Door Homer – Bob Dylan & The Band (take 2; The Basement Tapes) (photo, Rick Danko and Bob Dylan in 1967, by Arie De Reus)]

[Wicked Messenger – Bob Dylan]

[Raven – Karen Elson (photo by Glen Luchford)]

[Speak Low – Lotte Lenya (written by Kurt Weill & Ogden Nash; from Broadway musical One Touch of Venus (1943))]

[You Can’t Lose What You Ain’t Never Had – Muddy Waters; ft. Otis Spann on piano, Francis Clay on drums, Willie Dixon on bass, and some combination of Sammy Lawhorn, Pee Wee Madison, and Buddy Guy (on acoustic) on guitar.)]

[The Perfect Drug – Nine Inch Nails (images by Mark Romanek)]

[Karmacoma – Massive Attack; ft. Tricky]

[Sweet & Pungent – Duke Ellington]

[Overcome – Tricky; ft. Martina Topley-Bird ]

[Benjamin – Steven Bernstein]

[Altarwise By Owl Light (1st Verse) / A Pair Of Doves – Dylan Thomas / Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross (woodcuts by Antonio Frasconi)]

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All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

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THE DEMISE OF THE MASK (VOL. 8)__Bread & Circus ___

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If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

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demise_cvr_8

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Hello All.

Welcome to Volume Eight of the MixTape series: The Demise Of The Mask. –(Volume One here)__(Volume Two here)__(Volume Three here)__(Volume Four here)__(Volume Five here)__(Volume Six here)__(Volume Seven here)-

I’ve got quite a treat MixTape here for you as this one features a triple-play by Hamilton Leithauser: first there’s “We Can’t Be Beat” from the last album by his always fantastic group The Walkmen, 2012’s Heaven; then there’s a selection from Leithauser’s 2014 debut solo studio album, Black Hours; and finally there’s the song “When The Truth Is…” from last year’s stunning record I Had a Dream That You Were Mine, which is a collaborative work with Rostam Batmanglij (the former multi-instrumentalist and producer of Vampire Weekend).

You’ll also hear Aretha Franklin, some Beastie Boys, the lovely “Rainbows In Gasoline” by the duo of Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl who record together under the moniker of The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (or GOASTT), and a fine example of why John Lennon was one of the greatest of rock ‘n’ roll vocalists with The Beatles‘ tune “All I’ve Got To Do.”

As well, there are two selections from the Parliament-Funkadelic collective: first there’s a cover of The Beatles by incendiary yet so sweet guitarist Eddie Hazel from his 1977 solo debut Game, Dames and Guitar Thangs, which features incredible vocals by The Brides of Funkenstein (the duo of Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry, who prior to joining the P-Funk collective were members of Sly and the Family Stone); later on you’ll catch the revolving, kaleidoscopic groove of “Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication” from Parliament‘s 1975 masterpiece, Mothership Connection.

Oh and I can’t forget to mention the rendition of Magic Sam‘s All Of Your Love” done with grit and precision by The Rolling Stones and taken from their joyous record of blues covers released at the end of last year, Blue & Lonesome.

Among a whole bunch of other great sounds this mix also features two figures who are perhaps the most poetic recording artists of Uruguayan music: Jaime Roos and Eduardo Mateo. The song “Viviendo” is from Roos’ third record, Aquello released in 1981. There is a translation done by my father below for those that are interested:

Viviendo (Living) by Jaime Roos [translated by Julio Calero]
I remember you
You’re the One
Who could understand  it
No big deal
That we do not love each other
You could understand it
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
You’ll find me
Living
.
You’ll hear
The world was
And will be a marvel, I already know
It could be
My voice
Coming out of a nightmare that’s gone
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
where abouts may you be?
Living
Alone, perhaps
Living

Throughout his long career Jaime Roos has continued to make an interesting mix of rock and folk with the more traditional sounds of Uruguay like candombe, milonga, tango and murga. He’s still out there performing and I highly recommend that if you ever have the opportunity you should definitely catch his show!

 Eduardo Mateo‘s “Niña” is a sweet tune done by a pure musician, and its recording comes with an interesting story. By the time Mateo’s phenomenal band El Kinto had officially disintegrated in the early part of 1970 most of Mateo’s friends and associates were already convinced that he had gone completely insane. Despite the fact that these same people viewed him as a musical genius, they did not know what to make of his habits of disappearing for days at a time, either to lock himself up somewhere in a rented room to explore new realms on his instrument while searching for spiritual enlightenment through chemicals, or to wander the streets with nothing but pajamas and a guitar—there was always a guitar, a rare constant in this man’s unhinged life. Once, my uncle saw him walking the streets at night with one foot aligned with the curb, the other with the gutter, so that he was forced to maintain an awkward and drastic limp to his gait—how’s that for a metaphor?!

Speaking of this period in Mateo’s life, Uruguayan singer Verónica Indart had this story to tell:

“The last time I saw him was in the first years of the 1970s. I was

with Héctor, my husband, and Mateo arrived. He entered, he took

up the guitar, and he sat down to play by the window, looking at the

sea for a long while. We listened to him. When he finished, he got up,

he set down the guitar and he went out the door without a greeting.

That was Mateo. He arrived, gave us his music and went on without

greeting us, because it was not necessary” (Lion Production, 2006).

In 1971, for those who were fortunate to have heard Mateo play there was no doubt of that man’s overwhelming talent—mental illness or not; however, beyond a handful of tracks there existed little recorded evidence of it. This would soon change due to the influence of talented singer Diane Denoir, and through the dedication and passion of producer Carlos Píriz. Píriz, a recording technician who had worked for the live, music television show Discodromo had recently started the record label De la Planta along with Jorge “Coyo” Abuchalja, guitarist for the group Los Delfines. The ethos behind this venture was to maintain a Uruguayan label that was dedicated to Uruguayan musicians, providing them with better production, recording techniques, and better distribution than the then norm. Fortunately, through Píriz’s connections, they were able to secure regular studio time at ION Studios in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the recording technology was far superior to that found in their native country (four tracks as opposed to two at most, for example).

In October of 1971 one such artist they chose to present to the public was the singer Diane Denoir. As she was recording a fair amount of Mateo’s material for her De la Planta debut, she felt it was only appropriate that the artist himself accompany her on some of the tracks. Having convinced Mateo to take the trip, Píriz quickly took advantage of the rare opportunity by persuading him to stay and record a solo LP for the label. However, in spite of Píriz’s optimistic plans to complete the recording in one week, he soon found that dealing with this erratic artist would be an ultimate test of endurance and patience.

The sessions went like this: Mateo had an alphabetic notebook,

and stuck in each page he had bar napkins upon which his songs

were written. If he knew the first letter of the title of the song he

wished to play, he would find the correct napkin, which would help

him remember the melody, so that he could recreate the original idea

he had envisioned when he had composed the song in the first place.

Remembering the songs was only the first obstacle […]. Mateo

would record songs one day, and erase them the next. “The first day

he recorded three or four things,” Píriz recalled. “The following day

he came in and said, ‘erase them. For Mateo, they are all wrong.’

We erased them. And that process of erasing the previous day’s work

continued for four or five days. At that moment, I understood that this

would be the system for the whole disc […]. I decided that I will be the

person who says what was well-recorded, or not, and I began to keep

all the material.”

On other days, Mateo went to ION studios only to say that he was not

inspired, and would return the next day. Then there were the days that

he appeared at the studio, and asked, “What time do we record tomorrow?”

“The same as today, at four o’clock,” Píriz would say. “Okay I am going,

until tomorrow,” was Mateo’s only reply (Lion Production, 2006).

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This whole arduous process continued for two months, until one day when Mateo said to the producer that he was stepping out of the studio to buy a pack of cigarettes, and never came back. He had returned to his streets in Montevideo. Píriz was left holding hours of recordings of these fragmented sessions—the only proof that Mateo had even been there. A labor of love, Píriz would then spend the better part of a year assembling these into the album that would be released in December of 1972: Mateo Solo Bien Se Lame.

One of the thirteen brilliant compositions that Píriz extracted from the chaos is the twisted beauty that is “Niña.” Through his dedication, Píriz was able to capture on this record the complex sensitivity of this troubled artist. Seeing as how, other than a rare background vocal here and there, Mateo created every sound on this album himself, his essence truly shines through each composition. There is a translation of the lyrics done by me below:

Niña (Little Girl) by Eduardo Mateo [translated by Bobby Calero]
Little girl that always has a light
showing you what you do not want.
Do not fear the birds
if they say your life with their trills.
It should be that you understand;
that’s why what comes next is what has gone.
Always in a white dress,
you go but beware;
The devils in the guise of angels
will notice you talking.
Does it shame you that you don’t care
what has been soiled?
Yuu…yu-le-lé yu-lé.
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If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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demise_cvr_8

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:
__The Demise Of The Mask (Vol 8)__Bread & Circus ___
  • Pick Pocket – Andy Votel
  • I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)
  • All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles
  • Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin
  • Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions
  • Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
  • Been & Gone – Annette Peacock
  • Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs
  • I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers
  • Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra
  • Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament
  • Kissing My Love – Afrique
  • Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys
  • All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover)
  • Viviendo – Jaime Roos
  • We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen
  • Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser
  • When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam
  • Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger
  • Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader
  • Niña – Eduardo Mateo
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bread-circus-2
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[Pick Pocket - Andy Votel]

[Pick Pocket – Andy Votel]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots (photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
(photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[We Can't Be Beat - The Walkmen]

[We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

.
__________——————– =__^__=___________________———
___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

THE DEMISE OF THE MASK (VOL 6)

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Hello All.

Welcome to Volume Six of the MixTape series: The Demise Of The Mask. –(Volume One here)__(Volume Two here)__(Volume Three here)__(Volume Four here)__(Volume Five here)-

This one features some fine tunes by the likes of Paul Simon; Childish GambinoPop Levi; (producer/arranger of Chess Records subsidiary label Cadet Records) Richard Evans with his late ’60s studio project The Soulful Strings; something from Paul McCartney‘s side-project with Youth under the moniker of The Fireman; something from MegapussDevendra Banhart‘s 2008 side-project with the wonderfully talented Gregory Rogove, Fabrizio Moretti & Noah Georgeson; and a long groove by one of the greatest groups of all time, Parliament-Funkadelic! Oh and you’ll hear a captivating alternate take of the 2005 song Bob Dylan wrote and recorded for the North Country Soundtrack, “Tell Ol’ Bill” and the mid-’70s track “Mary Long” by Indian psych rock band Atomic Forest. There’s also a triple-play from The Flaming Lips‘ stunning 2009 record, Embryonic. I am particularly fond of the nervous respect given to the power of creativity that is conveyed in the third of these tunes, “Powerless“:

“Honey, you’re just paranoid
“You should do what you enjoy
“No one is ever really powerless”
That’s what she said and she gave me a kiss
“No one is ever really powerless”
Now I think I know what that really is
 –
It only happens if you try
Pain and pleasure both get you high
“No one is ever really powerless”
That’s what she said, now I can’t forget
“No one is ever really powerless”
Now I think I know what that really is

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You’ll hear all this and more so press play and enjoy yourself!

 

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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demise-cvr-6

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:
__The Demise Of The Mask (Vol 6)__Automobile Pets ___
  • Mommy, What’s A Funkadelic? – Funkadelic
  • Terrifying [Starlight & Wonder Version] – Pop Levi
  • Me And Your Mama – Childish Gambino
  • Older Lives – Megapuss (Devendra Banhart, Gregory Rogove, Fabrizio Moretti & Noah Georgeson)
  • Skin I’m In – Sly & The Family Stone
  • Terrifying (For Kenneth Anger) – Pop Levi
  • Severed Crossed Fingers – St. Vincent
  • Illusion – Keith Richards, ft. Norah Jones
  • Tell Ol’ Bill – Bob Dylan
  • Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child – The Soulful Strings
  • God Bless The Child – Cal Tjader & Mary Stallings
  • Travelling Light – The Fireman (Paul McCartney & Youth)
  • Gemini Syringes / Your Bats / Powerless – The Flaming Lips, ft. Thorsten Wörmann & Karen O
  • Mary Long – Atomic Forest
  • The Obvious Child – Paul Simon
  • Rebong – Andrew McGraw
  • Believe – Annabel (lee)
  • Kiss Me – Tom Waits
  • Steel Dreams [Part 2] – crush_DLX (Pop Levi & Bunny Holiday)
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[Mommy, What’s A Funkadelic? – Funkadelic (art by Dan Lish)]

[Mommy, What’s A Funkadelic? – Funkadelic (art by Dan Lish)]

[Terrifying [Starlight & Wonder Version] – Pop Levi]

[Terrifying [Starlight & Wonder version] – Pop Levi]

[Me And Your Mama – Childish Gambino (art by Nando Maglutac)]

[Me And Your Mama – Childish Gambino (art by Nando Maglutac)]

[Older Lives – Megapuss (Devendra Banhart, Gregory Rogove, Fabrizio Moretti & Noah Georgeson (art by Travis Millard and Mel Kadel)]

[Older Lives – Megapuss (Devendra Banhart, Gregory Rogove, Fabrizio Moretti & Noah Georgeson (art by Travis Millard and Mel Kadel)]

[Skin I’m In – Sly & The Family Stone]

[Skin I’m In – Sly & The Family Stone]

[Terrifying (For Kenneth Anger) – Pop Levi]

[Terrifying (For Kenneth Anger) – Pop Levi]

[Severed Crossed Fingers – St. Vincent]

[Severed Crossed Fingers – St. Vincent]

[Illusion – Keith Richards, ft. Norah Jones]

[Illusion – Keith Richards, ft. Norah Jones]

[Tell Ol’ Bill – Bob Dylan]

[Tell Ol’ Bill – Bob Dylan]

[Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child – The Soulful Strings]

[Sometimes I Feel Like A Motherless Child – The Soulful Strings]

[God Bless The Child – Cal Tjader & Mary Stallings]

[God Bless The Child – Cal Tjader & Mary Stallings]

[Travelling Light – The Fireman (Paul McCartney & Youth)]

[Travelling Light – The Fireman (Paul McCartney & Youth)]

[Gemini Syringes / Your Bats / Powerless – The Flaming Lips, ft. Thorsten Wörmann & Karen O (art from Wayne Coyne's comic "The Sun Is Sick")]

[Gemini Syringes / Your Bats / Powerless – The Flaming Lips, ft. Thorsten Wörmann & Karen O (art from Wayne Coyne’s comic “The Sun Is Sick“)]

[Mary Long – Atomic Forest]

[Mary Long – Atomic Forest]

[The Obvious Child – Paul Simon]

[The Obvious Child – Paul Simon]

[Rebong – Andrew McGraw]

[Rebong – Andrew McGraw]

[Believe – Annabel (lee)]

[Believe – Annabel (lee)]

[Kiss Me – Tom Waits (photo by Michael O'Brien)]

[Kiss Me – Tom Waits (photo by Michael O’Brien)]

[Steel Dreams [Part 2] – crush_DLX (Pop Levi & Bunny Holiday)]

[Steel Dreams [Part 2] – crush_DLX (Pop Levi & Bunny Holiday)]

__________——————– =__^__=___________________———
___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

OCCUPY MY MIND WITH THOUGHTS ON OCCUPY MY MIND

“It all exists, even if it’s in your mind. Who’s to say that dreams and nightmares aren’t as real as the here and now? Reality leaves a lot to the imagination.”

John Lennon

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Allowing my last post to bleed into this one, here’s a quote by Howlin’ Wolf given in 1968, shortly after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr.:

“Somebody has been cashing checks and they’ve been bouncing back on us, and these people, the poor class of Negroes and the poor class of white people, they’re getting tired of it. And sooner or     later it’s going to bring on a disease on this country, a disease that’s going to spring from midair and it’s going to be bad. It’s like a spirit from some dark valley, something that sprung up from the ocean…Like Lucifer is on the earth” (Gates, 2004).

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At first I was not quite sure how I felt about the whole “Occupy Wall Street” movement and could certainly understand the frequent critique that they did not express a clear “message” nor provided direct, and comprehensive “solutions” to their myriad grievances. However, as I was discussing the topic recently with a good friend of mine, I realized that the message might truly be a simple “Shit is fucked up!” It might not be eloquent—or serve well as a slogan for a Shepard Fairey poster—but I believe that this is what it all boils down to…somewhere back there we made a wrong turn, and we all need to register that fact first before we carry on with finding the right way forward.

Sometimes, “solving problems is not good enough or even the point, when the hardest task is not to denounce evil, but to see it” (Marcus, 1975).

Some suck their teeth and deign to say, “Get a job!” Sure, but then what? Particularly when in the grand scheme of the here & now, regardless of what you might think of your position and the comforts it affords you, we are all essentially shoveling shit in some debtors’ prison to please some plantation warden whose name we never even caught, nor knew we were indentured to. We are on the cusp of 2012 and still we live in a world where there are divergent rules and regulations for a particular set of privileged individuals, while the remaining masses are relegated to a servant-class status at best; at worst are horrors too innumerable to begin to list here.

Several months ago, a Polish émigré who abandoned a career in L.A. and now lives as a masseuse/farmer in Costa Rica said to me (after divulging her admiration for Alex Jones) “C’mon guys, we are living in the future; we should be building cathedrals of music, not fighting stupid little wars all for somebody else’s wallet.” Next she advised me to “throw out your television,” something that I admittedly am not quite ready for, but I do believe she has a point; shouldn’t we be somewhere else by now, somewhere other than here?

V For Vendetta by Alan Moore and David Lloyd

      Alan Moore, the man (along with David Lloyd) behind the mask that has been co-opted as a symbol for much of what these movements represent, recently gave an interesting interview to Honest Publishing (2011) in which he discusses the Occupy movement, and the fascinating idea of ideological change. I have posted some excerpts below:

Alan Moore [photo by Mitch Jenkins, 2010].

“As far as I can see, the Occupy movement is just ordinary people reclaiming rights which should always have been theirs. I can’t think of any reason why as a population we should be expected to stand by and see a gross reduction in the living standards of ourselves and our kids, possibly for generations, when the people who have got us into this have been rewarded for it; they’ve certainly not been punished in any way because they’re ‘too big to fail.’ I think that the Occupy movement is, in one sense, the public saying that they should be the ones to decide who’s too big to fail. It’s a completely justified howl of moral outrage and it seems to be handled in a very intelligent, non-violent way […].

“What do you think needs to change in our political system?

“Everything. I believe that what’s needed is a radical solution, by which I mean from the roots upwards. Our entire political thinking seems to me to be based upon medieval precepts. These things, they didn’t work particularly well five or six hundred years ago. Their slightly modified forms are not adequate at all for the rapidly changing territory of the 21st Century.

“We need to overhaul the way that we think about money, we need to overhaul the way that we think about who’s running the show. As an anarchist, I believe that power should be given to the people, to the people whose lives this is actually affecting. It’s no longer good enough to have a group of people who are controlling our destinies. The only reason they have the power is because they control the currency. They have no moral authority and, indeed, they show the opposite of moral authority.

“With politics at the moment seemingly determined to keep ploughing on their same destructive course because they can’t think of anything other to do, when we’re facing the possibility of an economic apocalypse, of potentially an environmental apocalypse, we don’t necessarily have an infinite amount of time. I think that since our leaders are not going to address any of these problems then we really have no choice than to attempt to wrest the steering wheel from them. If they’re aiming at the precipice with the accelerator pedal flat to the floor, then we don’t have any other choices left. Do it now, in this generation, because we don’t how many more there’s going to be.

“So something has to be done […]. I would suggest beheading the bankers, but while it would be very satisfying and would cheer us up, it probably wouldn’t do anything practical to alter the situation. Behead the currency. Change the currency, why not? It would disempower all the people who had bought into that currency but it would pretty much empower the rest of us, the other ninety-nine percent” (Honest Publishing, 2011).

I think at this point in time it is quite obvious that we need something new, something other. In an attempt to be clear as to where I position my ass in relation to the fence, I am not opposed to civil disobedience, and I am certainly not advocating that we find recourse in performing pagan rituals with menstrual blood and hallucinogens “on the endless expanse of a Nevada prehistoric lake bed” (Grigoriadis, 2006, p.90), but perhaps we need to occupy our heads with new ideas about what it is we think we are doing here, and just why we are doing it?

There is a tendency in society to firmly believe that what there is, is all there is, forever, and ever, amen; close the book, grit your teeth, and shrug your shoulders. However, a mere glance over those shoulders back into history reveals countless worlds firmly fixed within the confines of their supposed reality: realities that today we either reject wholesale, or vivisect for whatever bits we wish to cling to…and sometimes those realities only linger because they’re making someone money.

Our current financial system, now seemingly entrenched into even every little spasm of our synapses, appears to work exceptionally well.  Unfortunately, it does so only for those who were designated heirs-apparent during the design phase of this system’s architecture. Whether this lineage is through actual bloodlines or more of an inheritance through mutual ethics (or lack thereof), for the rest of us it’s a mug’s game. We’ll never get ahead this way. If the game has been bought, sold, and won a long time ago, perhaps it is time we invented a new game? It’s either that or one day we’re going to kick the whole board over in a fit, and if that day comes you better take shelter.

                                      Gimme Shelter By Cal Tjader—————Click To Listen

Like it? buy it.

Callen Radcliffe Tjader, Jr. a.k.a. Cal Tjader (July 16, 1925–May 5, 1982) was a vibes player who played with Dave Brubeck and in George Shearing’s quintet in the early fifties before forming his own group and going on to gain an international reputation for his distinctive musical style that encompassed Latin, jazz, and soul music (McClellan, 2004). Signing to Fantasy Records in 1971, Cal Tjader released Agua Dulce with its hypnotic rendition of The Rolling Stone’s “Gimme Shelter.”

Arranged by Ed Bogas the song features: Cal Tjader, vibes; Rita Dowling, Moog Synthesizer; Micheal Smithe & Pete Escovedo, Congas; Coke Escovedo’ Timbales; and either Richard Berk or Lee Charlton, Drums.

—————

To stay within the theme, here’s “Mr Guy Fawkes” performed by the Australian psychedelic rock group, The Dave Miller Set. Originally written by guitarist Mick Cox of the Irish group Eire Apparent (who opened for Jimi Hendrix’s America tour of ’68), Dave Miller remodeled the song to be his group’s single in 1969 (Kimbal). I love Dave Miller’s proto-Layne Staley vocals atop this orchestrated ballad with a boot-stomping backbeat.

“Mr Guy Fawkes”

by The Dave Miller Set: Dave Miller (vocals), John Robinson (guitar), Leith Corbett (bass), Mike McCormack (drums). Produced by Pat Aulton.

Although I’ve by no means reached a terminus to my thought processes on these matters, I remain firm in my belief that there is much more than just all this.

Ref:

Cox, M. (1968). Mr. Guy Fawkes [recorded by The Dave Miller Set]. On Mr.Guy Fawkes (single). Spin Records. (1969)

Gates, D. (2004). Delta Force. The New York Times. Retrieved Dec. 22, 2011 from http://www.nytimes.com/2004/06/13/books/delta-force.html

Grigoriadis, V. (2006, September 7). Daniel Pinchbeck and the new psychedelic elite. Rolling Stone, 1008, 89-90, 114-117.

Honest Publishing. (2011). The Honest Alan Moore Interview. Honest Publishing. Retrieved Dec. 23rd, 2011 from http://www.honestpublishing.com/news/the-honest-alan-moore-interview-part-2-the-occupy-movement-frank-miller-and-politics/

Jagger/Richards. (1969). Gimme Shelter [recorded by Cal Tjader]. On Agua Dulce [CD] Fantasy. (1971) BGP. (2011)

Kimbal, D. (n.d.) The Dave Miller Set, Sydney, 1967-1970, 1973. MILESAGO: Australasian Music and Popular Culture 1964-1975. Retrieved Dec. 23rd, 2011 from http://www.milesago.com/artists/dms.htm

Lawrence, K. (2005). John Lennon: In His Own Words. Andrews McMeel Publishing.

McClellan, Jr., L. (2004). Tjader, Callen “Cal” (1925–1982). The Later Swing Era, 1942 to 1955. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. 2004. 303. Retrieved Dec. 23rd, 2011 from Gale Virtual Reference Library at http://go.galegroup.com.queens.ezproxy.cuny.edu:2048/ps/i.do?id=GALE%7CCX2891100647&v=2.1&u=cuny_queens&it=r&p=GVRL&sw=w

Marcus, G. (1975). Mystery train (4TH ed.). New York: Penguin.

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