Category Archives: Sam Cooke

Some Situation and Sunder During Days Eight Thru Fourteen On The Abundant Earth

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

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Hello All! Here’s a quick one for The Fall.

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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Some Situation and Sunder During Days Eight Thru Fourteen On The Abundant Earth
  • Rubber Ducky – Quincy Jones
  • U KNOW – Prince
  • Falling Into Grace – Red Hot Chili Peppers
  • Babylon Wrong – Ashanti Waugh
  • Give Me Power – The Stingers (produced by Lee “Scratch” Perry)
  • People– J Dilla
  • For What It’s Worth – Staple Singers (Buffalo Springfield Cover)
  • Let Me Be Good To You – Carla Thomas
  • Baby, Let’s Play House – Elvis Presley
  • Lady – tUnE-yArDs, ?Uestlove, Angelique Kidjo, Akua Naru (Fela Kuti cover)
  • Golden Years – David Bowie
  • Heart Of The Country – Paul & Linda McCartney
  • Medley: Sun King / Mean Mr. Mustard / Polythene Pam / She Came In Through The Bathroom Window / I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Booker T. & The MG’s (Beatles cover)
  • Ohio Machine Gun – The Isley Brothers (Neil Young / Jimi Hendrix cover)
  • Water No Get Enemy – Fela Kuti
  • Mean Old World – Sam Cooke
  • Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out – Nina Simone
  • If Somebody Told You – Anna King
  • I Can’t Give Everything Away – David Bowie

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Some Situation and Sunder During Days Eight  

         Thru Fourteen On The Abundant Earth

.——————–

The recluse,

in his swollen tower,

sings of the indigo evenings and the soft hour

our

lives are spent searching thirsty for.

.

Leaning over the parapet

of his tower, the recluse gets

irate at this metropolis

of candles lit, and so, with lips

pursed, he spits, this done with the hopes

to extinguish at least one single flame tethered by a black wick.

.

D

O

W

N

.

.

.

Out in the field, beasts of the earth consume vegetable meat;

Lilith completes another cruel labor, amniotic

fluid and blood splattered on her ankles, on her bare feet.

Anticipating from Adam an alimony check,

she lies prostrate in the dust, braids her raven tresses, waits,

and proceeds to procreate her sundown breed

within vision of Eden’s combustion gate .

.

Bill Whistle

and The Skeleton Crew

sketch, with fingers broken,

undergarments below

emerald gowns

on

the ladies of passing fashion.

.

Poor Lester

gets his rest while within

the convalescent tents

pitched amongst the vapor

caravans

that

roll along a paper trail of tears.

He is hoping for a cure

for his tuberculosis.

Still, when asked “how’s it goin?” he’ll say

“Everything is coming up roses.”

.

Thessaly

entered the gallery

with her wardrobe bible

tucked under her left arm,

while all the double-parked cars sat idle

in the warm sunset soot of monoxide armor.

.

She possessed

elaborate aesthetics,

like an ornate train wreck,

meticulous design,

down to each

fine

detail: her eyes, blue steel off the rail;

all else, fluid limbs of collision flames;

curves of metal awry, out of reach.

                                                           The cathedral bells knell for Monday morning mass

Preserved in

fluids, a scorpion

serves as a belt buckle,

where her two thumbs are hooked

over the amber glass.

One and all

look.

She ensnares every pliant eye

in the iron of her gestures.

.

The Recluse drops his cowboy boot’s wooden heel upon a cockroach

.

Poor Lester

coughs blossoms of blood from the lungs when he sees this blonde disaster.

The skeletal cool kids abscond behind a magazine curtain,

where they all paint their sex organs with the scent of neon cologne.

Bill’s jaw drops as his lips fall slack, and he remains stuck uncertain.

He could not help but rubberneck and question the motives, divine,

in the bedlam of her approach.

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[Rubber Ducky - Quincy Jones]

[Rubber Ducky – Quincy Jones]

[U KNOW - Prince]

[U KNOW – Prince]

[Falling Into Grace - Red Hot Chili Peppers]

[Falling Into Grace – Red Hot Chili Peppers]

[Babylon Wrong - Ashanti Waugh]

[Babylon Wrong – Ashanti Waugh]

[Give Me Power - The Stingers ]

[Give Me Power – The Stingers ] (produced by Lee “Scratch” Perry)

[People- J Dilla]

[People– J Dilla]

[For What It's Worth - Staple Singers]

[For What It’s Worth – Staple Singers]

[Let Me Be Good To You - Carla Thomas]

[Let Me Be Good To You – Carla Thomas]

[Baby, Let's Play House - Elvis Presley]

[Baby, Let’s Play House – Elvis Presley]

[Lady - tUnE-yArDs, ?Uestlove, Angelique Kidjo, Akua Naru (Fela Kuti cover)]

[Lady – tUnE-yArDs, ?Uestlove, Angelique Kidjo, Akua Naru (Fela Kuti cover)]

[Golden Years - David Bowie]

[Golden Years – David Bowie]

[Heart Of The Country - Paul & Linda McCartney]

[Heart Of The Country – Paul & Linda McCartney]

[Medley: Sun King / Mean Mr. Mustard / Polythene Pam / She Came In Through The Bathroom Window / I Want You (She's So Heavy) - Booker T. & The MG's]

[Medley: Sun King / Mean Mr. Mustard / Polythene Pam / She Came In Through The Bathroom Window / I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Booker T. & The MG’s]

[Ohio Machine Gun - The Isley Brothers (Neil Young / Jimi Hendrix cover)]

[Ohio Machine Gun – The Isley Brothers (Neil Young / Jimi Hendrix cover)]

[Water No Get Enemy - Fela Kuti]

[Water No Get Enemy – Fela Kuti]

[Mean Old World - Sam Cooke]

[Mean Old World – Sam Cooke]

[Nobody Knows You When You're Down And Out - Nina Simone]

[Nobody Knows You When You’re Down And Out – Nina Simone]

[If Somebody Told You - Anna King]

[If Somebody Told You – Anna King]

[I Can't Give Everything Away - David Bowie]

[I Can’t Give Everything Away – David Bowie]

___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you digaparticular artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: NUPTIALS

Hello all,

and welcome to what will be the last post for the summer! I’ve got a special triptych-mixtape for you all today! About a week back a good friend of mine asked that I produce a few mixes for a gathering the night before his wedding. Unfortunately (like, whatever, y’know) due to technical difficulties they could not be played that evening (the entire wedding weekend, however, was absolutely fantastic!). Anyway, not one to let a good MixTape go to waste, I present them to you here. I do believe them to be real nice & easy, and tons of fun, with some great tunes that have been featured here in these pages before and some that I was planning on getting to someday.

May these serve you well here at the tail-end of the summer! So sit back, roll forward, and enjoy!

But above all–ENJOY YOURSELF!__

Nuptials-cvr___________________

Volume I—Click here to listen & Download——-

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Volume II—Click here to listen & Download——-

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Volume III—Click here to listen & Download——-

_________________________________________________

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: NUPTIALS

VOLUME ONE:

  1. Pre-Nump – Outkast
  2. When You’re Smiling and Astride Me – Father John Misty
  3. Here I Am (Come And Take Me) – Al Green
  4. Happy – The Rolling Stones
  5. Alright, Okay, You Win – Peggy Lee
  6. You Make Loving Fun – Fleetwood Mac
  7. Baby It’s You – The Beatles
  8. Let Me Be Good To You – Carla Thomas
  9. Try (Just A Little Bit Harder) – Janis Joplin
  10. River Deep – Mountain High – Harry Nilsson
  11. Beautiful Girl – INXS
  12. Over The Hills And Far Away – Led Zeppelin
  13. The Brides Have Hit Glass – Guided By Voices
  14. What A Woman – Howlin’ Wolf
  15. The Spy – The Doors
  16. Light My Fire – Al Green
  17. Shake Your Hips – The Rolling Stones
  18. We Can Work It Out – Stevie Wonder
  19. CREEP – Afghan Whigs
  20. Tenement Lady – T.Rex
  21. John, I’m Only Dancing – David Bowie
  22. Fool I Am – Pat Ferguson
  23. I Just Want To Make Love To You – Etta James
  24. Let Me Roll It – Paul McCartney & Wings

VOLUME TWO:

  1. Your Southern Can is Mine – The White Stripes
  2. When I Look In Your Eyes – André 3000
  3. Lady Madonna – Fats Domino
  4. Loving Cup – The Rolling Stones
  5. Ring Of Fire – Ray Charles
  6. Rag Mama Rag – The Band
  7. Pretty Thing – Bo Diddley
  8. Tee Pees 1-12 – Father John Misty
  9. Would You – Richard Swift
  10. Andy’s Chest – Lou Reed
  11. Milkcow Blues Boogie – Elvis Presley
  12. Slow Down – Backbeat Band
  13. Rip It Up/ Ready Teddy – John Lennon
  14. Surprise Surprise (Sweet Bird Of Paradox) – John Lennon
  15. Live with Me – The Rolling Stones
  16. Planet Queen – T.Rex
  17. She Belongs To Me – Bob Dylan
  18. Black Is the Color – Rhiannon Giddens
  19. I Gotta Know – Wanda Jackson
  20. Love Having You Around – Stevie Wonder
  21. Right – David Bowie
  22. Oh! Darling – The Beatles
  23. Call On Me – Big Brother And The Holding Company (feat. Janis Joplin)
  24. Candy – Iggy Pop

VOLUME THREE:

  1. Mystify – INXS
  2. Be Kind – Devendra Banhart
  3. Didn’t I – Darondo
  4. Mind Games – George Clinton
  5. Dear Prudence – The Beatles
  6. Little Red Rooster – Sam Cooke
  7. Sweet Feeling – Candi Staton
  8. Idlewild Blue (Don’t Chu Worry ‘Bout Me) – André 3000
  9. Rusty Cage – Johnny Cash
  10. Can You Get To That? – Funkadelic
  11. Yazoo Street Scandal – The Band
  12. Police & Thieves – The Clash
  13. Do Unto Others – Pee Wee Crayton
  14. Goin’ To Acapulco – Jim James & Calexico
  15. Candela – Buena Vista Social Club
  16. Momma Miss America – Paul McCartney
  17. Got To Get You Into My Life – Chris Clark
  18. Wah-Wah – George Harrison
  19. Mean To Me – Dean Martin
  20. This Magic Moment – Lou Reed
  21. Be My Baby – John Lennon

______________________________________

It’s Good to Feel you are Close to Me

It’s good to feel you are close to me in the night, love,
invisible in your sleep, intently nocturnal,
while I untangle my worries
as if they were twisted nets.

Withdrawn, your heart sails through dream,
but your body, relinquished so, breathes
seeking me without seeing me perfecting my dream
like a plant that seeds itself in the dark.

Rising, you will be that other, alive in the dawn,
but from the frontiers lost in the night,
from the presence and the absence where we meet ourselves,

something remains, drawing us into the light of life
as if the sign of the shadows had sealed
its secret creatures with flame.

__________

Pablo Neruda, from Cien Sonetos de Amor (1959).

______________

All the best to you & yours,

(Oh, and J2 & Dana, despite this entry in Ambrose Bierce’s The Unabridged Devil’s Dictionary, “Love, noun. A temporary insanity curable by marriage;” I love you guys, wish you well, and know you will make and remain a fine union in the light of life),

Bobby Calero

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 2)

Mireille had grown weary of feeling that our experience of existence had unavoidably resulted in a tape delay.

“We are held hostage in someone else’s head…and in the end…and in our own. Regret will only get you ugly in the end.”

She considered the device currently slipped within a little zippered pocket inside her purse: plastic, glass, semiconductor chips of silicon, and rare earth minerals molded and arranged into a slim rectangle of circuit boards and a touchscreen with a friendly graphic user interface. Contemplating all it was capable of—all of its known, numerous applications, the ones she hasn’t figured out yet and the ones she didn’t care to—she asked herself:

“We’re already living in the future…aren’t we? …Or as far as this future is gonna go, really. From here-on-out and for awhile now it’s all just restatements of a theme, sure with a few innovative variations and tempo changes thrown in to keep us back-slap-smiling, ‘gee–whiz, how neat, this cutting-edge changes everything! Science will save us!’ But, shouldn’t we be somewhere else?

“Shouldn’t we be somewhere else and doing something other by now?”

A sudden nudge—Mireille felt a petite twitch of an impulse to check for updates and status changes. She rolled back the teeth of a zipper, then another, and pulled the phone from her bag. After a swipe, tap, tap, tap, tap of an index finger, another tap brought her to her home page. Lately, every time she logged in to her YouLoop account, over the remote din of row upon row of massive servers roaring away at some installation on a rural sprawl, an advert for an apparel company would pop-up with polished photos of professional mannequins—all so slender and young, all so pale-pink and fair-peach in skin tone, some sullen in denim, others with open mouths in graphic tees cavorting across the afternoon gloss of an open field—all asking in a bold white font atop a black background:

Who will be

“How the hell should I know?” Mireille said to herself. “How could anyone, when we don’t even know what these bundles of qualities we carry and call the self is right now at this moment?” After a distracted scroll down her digital profile’s wall, she logged off. Her phone was returned to its place.

Mireille had grown weary of feeling that our experience of existence had unavoidably resulted in a tape delay. Her suspicion was one of a procession of intervals. Each arriving on the heels of the other, there was enough space for our consciousness to spill a portion of its contents until they coil up to that moment’s capacity. Consciousness, that capo di tutti capi, with its arrogant tap to its bucket snout, yet so unaware of the sway on our days held by flora in the gut and all that other bacteria.

Once full we move on to the next container, but not before an often-inarticulate logging of our impressions on each repetitive step and making a remark or two about every noticeable variable. These recorded findings then color our notes on the subsequent one. Was that our allotted life, spinning on a color wheel? It is as if all our moments were truly only and always movements—some busy derivation from the game of hopscotch.

We scratch symmetry across the surface. We toss the little wet stone of our mind out into an interspersed series of linear and lateral blocks. We dance to retrieve it. We repeat the pattern.

However, here each lope and lollop to another square necessitates the player to perform a change of clothes to correspond with the color assigned to that box, while still taking into account the hue and tint from which they came. We amend our raiment—through Primary to Secondary to Tertiary—and every which way shade between. We slip on robust costumes and strut our feathers. Sometimes we are caught by the garish contrast of a complimentary pair and are required to dress in all white or all black. At other times our skitter through the squares causes us to consider too many pigments and we are left to squirm under attires like mud or wet cinder. But another hop could change all that: just a footstep away from that soot. One is almost certain that if they were to continue to play the game through they’d eventually land upon a true hue of you.

In our gambol across the grid we create relationships. We celebrate. We snicker. We share secrets.

In addition to this facet of the game, where catwalk runway and dressing room coalesce, we mustn’t forget the squares’ designated numbers and verse from their attendant Magpie Rhymes:

Zero for Earth;

One for sorrow,

Two for mirth;

Three for a wedding,

Four for birth;

Five for wealthy,

Six for poor;

Seven for some secret,

Forgotten Door;

Eight for a wish of Heaven,

Nine for a kiss of Hell;

And Ten a surprise for the Devils,

Who pray you get well!

_____________________                                 _________________                      _________________   _

Dendrites 2 cvr_______________________________   ——  —  ——–  _______________ –  __

——————————-(Click to Listen or Download)—————–

===================================  ======== == =    ==    =    = – __

Intro – Martina Topley-Bird

Oh Yeah – Foxygen

Every Boy and Girl – Lee Moses

Needles & Pins [alt. take] – Ramones

Let It Kill You – Imani Coppola

Looks Good With Trouble – Solange

Time 2 – Pharoahe Monch

Battling the City – Lilacs & Champagne

Your Brain Is Made of Candy – Mourn

Water – Juan Wauters

Clean [snippet] – Taylor Swift

New Mutation Boogie – Invisible Familiars

Gamma Ray (acoustic version) – Beck

Someone Like You – David Vandervelde

Sadder Day – Stephanie McKay

Fade Away And Radiate – Blondie

Laughing With A Mouth Of Blood – St. Vincent

Trouble Blues – Sam Cooke

U Looz – PRhyme (Royce da 5’9″ and DJ Premier)

Gimme A Chance – Azealia Banks

I Retired – Hamilton Leithauser

Poison – Martina Topley-Bird

Call The Law – Outkast (ft. Janelle Monáe)

Corner Pocket – Count Basie & His Orchestra

Biting My Nails – Genevieve Waite

Parakeet – Damon Albarn

Naked We Come– (by Jim Morrison – read by Johnny Depp)

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (Vol. 2)

  • Intro – Martina Topley-Bird
  • Oh Yeah – Foxygen
  • Every Boy and Girl – Lee Moses
  • Needles & Pins [alt. take] – Ramones
  • Let It Kill You – Imani Coppola
  • Looks Good With Trouble – Solange
  • Time 2 – Pharoahe Monch
  • Battling the City – Lilacs & Champagne
  • Your Brain Is Made of Candy – Mourn
  • Water – Juan Wauters
  • Clean [snippet] – Taylor Swift
  • New Mutation Boogie – Invisible Familiars
  • Gamma Ray (Acoustic) – Beck
  • Someone Like You – David Vandervelde
  • Sadder Day – Stephanie McKay
  • Fade Away And Radiate – Blondie
  • Laughing With A Mouth Of Blood – St. Vincent
  • Trouble Blues – Sam Cooke
  • U Looz – PRhyme (Royce da 5’9″ and DJ Premier)
  • Gimme A Chance – Azealia Banks
  • I Retired – Hamilton Leithauser
  • Poison – Martina Topley-Bird
  • Call The Law – Outkast (ft. Janelle Monáe)
  • Corner Pocket – Count Basie & His Orchestra
  • Biting My Nails – Genevieve Waite
  • Parakeet – Damon Albarn
  • Naked We Come – (by Jim Morrison – read by Johnny Depp)

__=========================================     ______

——————————————-BOBBY CALERO—————————–

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: ON THE GOOD BLOOD (VOL. 1-3)

Hello All,

Well I’ve got another triptych treat for you here today!

A friend recently asked me to create roughly four hours worth of appropriate tunes for an event she was helping to plan and present. Unfortunately, at the last minute she couldn’t use them. However–despite being put together on some short-notice and the fact that the majority of my albums are still packed up in boxes from a recent move–what I got left holding are what I consider to be some real dope MixTapes with a nice and easy forward groove going for them.

And that’s exactly what I’d like to share with you all.

Hopefully they’ll help you bend your knees, bop your head, and swivel your hips a bit on through this whole supposed “…in like a lion and out like a lamb…showers/flowers…” business we’ve been going through.

———ENJOY YOURSELF!———–

On The Good Blood

 

A Mouthful Of Pennies Presents: 

On The Good Blood (vol. 1)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)

——————————————————————————–

On The Good Blood (vol. 2)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)

—————————————————————————

On The Good Blood (vol. 3)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)—————

 

On The Good Blood VOL 1

 

A Mouthful Of Pennies Presents: On The Good Blood (vol. 1)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)

  •       Real Life Dreams On – Bernie Worrell
  •       I Can’t Get Next To You – Al Green
  •       Flute Thing – The Blues Project
  •       Love Having You Around – Stevie Wonder
  •       Brand New Orleans – Prince
  •       Corinne Corrina – Joe Turner
  •       Swegbe and Pako – Fela Kuti
  •       Going Down On Love (demo) – John Lennon
  •       Going Down Slow – Aretha Franklin
  •       Do Your Duty – Candi Staton
  •       It’s Your Thing – Lou Donaldson
  •       River Deep Mountain High – Bobby Doyle
  •       For You – Prince
  •       Listen – Imani Coppola
  •       Mama Get Yourself Together – Baby Huey and the Babysitters
  •       I’m In Love With You – Christopher Ellis (Cojie of Mighty Crown remix)
  •       Village Soul – Lennie Hibbert (Cojie of Mighty Crown remix remix)
  •       Warning Of Dub – Lee “Scratch” Perry
  •       Don’t Brag, Don’t Boast – Clancy Eccles
  •       Do Unto Others – Pee Wee Crayton
  •       Chops And Thangs – Beat Konducta [Madlib]

 

On The Good Blood VOL 2

 

A Mouthful Of Pennies Presents: On The Good Blood (vol. 2)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)————–

  •       Norwegian Wood – Count Basie
  •       Sir Greendown – Janelle Monáe
  •       Root Down – Jimmy Smith
  •       Behind the Scenes: Jazz – J.Period & Q-Tip
  •       “Let’s Do It” – Billie Holiday
  •       Bags’ Groove – Milt Jackson
  •       Sittin’ On The Dock Of The Bay – Peggy Lee
  •       I’m Shakin’ – Jack White
  •       Get Out Of My Life, Woman – Joe Williams
  •       Mixed-Up, Shook-Up Girl – Patty & the Emblems
  •       Hit Or Miss – Bo Diddley
  •       Mystic Brew – Ronnie Foster
  •       Medley: Golden Slumbers/Carry That Weight/The End/Here Comes The Sun/Come Together – Booker T. & The MG’s
  •       A Light In The Attic – Shel Silverstein
  •       Shakara – Fela Kuti
  •       Priority – Mos Def
  •       Viceroy’s Row – Elvis Costello & The Roots
  •       Armagideon Time (A.M.O.P. remix) – Willie Williams
  •       Lock Down – Cypress Hill

 

 

On The Good Blood VOL. 3

 

A Mouthful Of Pennies Presents: On The Good Blood (vol. 3)

———-(CLICK TO LISTEN & DOWNLOAD)—————

  •       Treat – Santana
  •       Suite V Electric Overture – Janelle Monáe
  •       Every Now and Then – The Shotgun Wedding Quintet
  •       You and Your Folks, Me and My Folks – Funkadelic
  •       In Time – Sly & The Family Stone
  •       Watching The Detectives – Elvis Costello
  •       Come The Meantimes – Elvis Costello & The Roots
  •       Jah Jah Me No Born Yah – Cornell Campbell
  •       Everything Is Everything – Booker T. Jones
  •       I Am the Walrus – Bud Shank
  •       Groovin – Willie Mitchell
  •       Fred Berry – Baby Elephant (Bernie Worrell, Prince Paul, Newkirk)
  •       Spinning Wheel – Peggy Lee
  •       Compared To What – John Legend & The Roots
  •       Security Of The First World – Public Enemy
  •       That’s The Way Love Is – Marvin Gaye
  •       Let Me Roll It – Paul McCartney & Wings
  •       You Gotta Move – Sam Cooke
  •       Born To Love You – Rose Royce
  •       “Broaden Our Minds” – The Joker (Jack Nicholson)
  •       Soulful Dress – Sugar Pie DeSanto
  •       Maggie’s Farm – Linda Gayle
  •       Medley: Because / You Never Give Me Your Money – Booker T. & The MG’s
  •       Call On Me (A.M.O.P. edit) – Big Brother And The Holding Company (feat. Janis Joplin)

—————————ROLL CALL————————  —   — –    –      –

Bernie Worrell

Al Green

The Blues Project

Stevie Wonder

Prince

Joe Turner

Fela Kuti

John Lennon

Aretha Franklin

Candi Staton

Lou Donaldson

Bobby Doyle

Imani Coppola

Baby Huey and the Babysitters

Christopher Ellis

Cojie of Mighty Crown

Lennie Hibbert

Lee “Scratch” Perry

Clancy Eccles

Pee Wee Crayton

Beat Konducta [Madlib]

Count Basie

Janelle Monáe

Jimmy Smith

J. Period

Billie Holiday (with Mister Downbeat)

Milt Jackson

Peggy Lee

Jack White

Joe Williams

Patty and the Emblems

Bo Diddley

Ronnie Foster

Booker T. & The MG’s

Shel Silverstein

Mos Def (aka Yasiin Bey)

Elvis Costello & The Roots

Willie Williams

Cypress Hill (B-Real, Sen Dog, DJ Muggs)

Santana

The Shotgun Wedding Quintet

Funkadelic

Sly & The Family Stone

Elvis Costello

Cornell Campbell

Booker T. Jones (w/ Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Kirk Douglass, & Owen Biddle)

Bud Shank

Willie Mitchell

Baby Elephant (Bernie Worrell, Prince Paul, Newkirk)

John Legend & The Roots

Public Enemy

Marvin Gaye

Paul McCartney & Wings

Sam Cooke

Rose Royce

The Joker (Jack Nicholson)

Bob Dylan

Sugar Pie DeSanto

Linda Gayle

Big Brother And The Holding Company (feat. Janis Joplin)

 

—————————–BOBBY CALERO———————————–   – —   –   –   –  –     –

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: TULPA HONEY (VOL. 1-3)

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thought-form of the Music of Gounod, according to Annie Besant and C.W. Leadbeater in Thought Forms (1901).

Music can take a man along the Path. Music is the image and the foreshadowing of the harmony that pervades the world and organizes its secret hierarchies. The motions of the spheres in the heavens are in conformity to harmony and proportion, so that, though their passage is made in perfect silence, that passage is musical. The Adept who seeks to make his life a work of art will comport himself in conformity with the harmony that is in all things. Even today’s debased popular ditties, redolent as they are of vaudeville shows and dance halls, speak of higher truths. As Sir Thomas Browne put it, music “is a Hieroglyphical and shadowed lesson of the whole World.”

—Dr. Felton in Satan Wants Me by ROBERT IRWIN (1999)

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HELLO ALL,

I’ve got quite a treat for you today! Emanating from and expanding upon the last mix—A Prayer For The New Year of The Tender HorseI present the triptych: Tulpa Honey. Bouncing upon that liminal spot where what-could-be and what-should-be converge with what-is, these three mixtapes also address a whole lot of what I’ve had rolling around in my head lately.

Be sure to snatch up all three for the full thought-form experience!

——–ENJOY YOURSELF!—–  —       –

TULPA HONEY COVER

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:

TULPA HONEY (VOL.  1) —  –   ————-______________\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

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TULPA HONEY (VOL.  2) –   ————-______________\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/

——————————-(Click to Listen or Right-Click-Save-As to Download)—————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  
TULPA HONEY (VOL.  3)—–
 —  –   ————-______________\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/
——————————-(Click to Listen or Right-Click-Save-As to Download)—————–================__^__===================  ===  _ ===== == =   = =  __  _

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[Cover Art: The Music of Gounod – a Thought Form from Thought-Forms, by Annie Besant & C.W. Leadbeater (1901).]

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:

TULPA HONEY (VOL. 1)

  • Nightmare—Dispute & violence – Ravi Shankar & George Harrison
  • Volunteered Slavery/Bern’s Blues – Bernie Worrell
  • Drinkin’ Again [Interlude]/? – Outkast
  • I Don’t Wanna Be Called Yo Niga [edit] – Public Enemy
  • Don’t Call Me Nigger, Whitey – Sly & The Family Stone
  • If You Don’t Like The Effects, Don’t Produce The Cause – Funkadelic
  • “I’m Not Happy Here” – Alicia Keys (2Pac/DJ Vlad)
  • Down And Out In New York City – James Brown
  • The Pledge Of Resistance/Break Dance—Electric Boogie [A.M.O.P. remix] – Saul Williams/West Street Mob (A.M.O.P. remix)
  • Liberation – Outkast feat. Big Rube, Cee-Lo, and Erykah Badu
  • Bliss: The Eternal Now/Meditation [edit] – Carlos Santana & Bill Laswell
  • So Soon/For What It’s Worth – Staple Singers
  • All You Fascists Bound To Lose – Woody Guthrie
  • The War In Vietnam – The Five Blind Boys Of Alabama
  • “The News” – Bill Hicks
  • Vietnow – Rage Against The Machine
  • What’s The Ugliest Part Of Your Body? (A.M.O.P. reprise) – Frank Zappa
  • FCK THE BELIEFS – Saul Williams
  • Right On/ Wholy Holy [edit] – Marvin Gaye
  • Rock Star/Malcolm X/Roots Of A Tree/Come Together (feat. Zion I) – The Roots & J. Period
  • Come Together [edit] – Count Basie Orchestra
  • Every Grain Of Sand (demo) – Bob Dylan
  • Dawn—Peace & hope [edit] – Ravi Shankar & George Harrison

TULPA HONEY (VOL. 2)

  • “Do Not Be Stuck In Your Ignorance”/Greasy Legs – Charles Manson/George Harrison
  • Tomorrow Never Knows – Junior Parker
  • Maggot Brain – Funkadelic
  • What’s The Ugliest Part Of Your Body? – Frank Zappa
  • Let Your Lovelight Shine – Buddy Miles Express
  • Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved – James Brown
  • “Dance With The Devil?” – The Joker (Jack Nicholson)
  • Infernal Dance of King Kastchei – Igor Stravinsky
  • “No Slack At All” – Charles Manson
  • Yaphet [edit] – Miles Davis
  • Revolution – Tupac ft. Busta Rhymes (DJ Green Lantern)
  • The Revolution (Brother–Gil) – Cinematic Orchestra ft. Gil Scott-Heron
  • “Same Old Monkey” – Charles Manson
  • Yaphet [edit] – Miles Davis
  • Have You Ever Seen The Blues – Yaphet Kotto
  • “Fighting For Peace” – Charles Manson
  • WTF! – Saul Williams
  • Illumination – Jonathan Wilson
  • Mala/Won’t You Come Home/Taurobolium – Devendra Banhart
  • In His Cell – Philip Glass & Kronos Quartet
  • His Holy Modal Majesty – Super Session (Al Kooper, Mike Bloomfield, Harvey Brooks, Eddie Hoh)
  • “A Reflection Of Somebody Else’s Mind” – Charles Manson
  • Shambala – Beastie Boys
  • Amazing Grace – Elvis Presley  

TULPA HONEY (VOL. 3)

  • Coniferae/Sonday/Point-Event – Mike Patton/Robert Calero
  • On The Bed – George Harrison
  • Amazing Grace Fragment – Bob Dylan
  • Amazing Grace – The Five Blind Boys Of Alabama
  • Mind Games (Demo) – John Lennon
  • Better Git It In Your Soul – Charles Mingus
  • Summer Trip – Bill Hicks
  • Something’s Got To Give – Beastie Boys
  • Hector – The Village Callers
  • Gimme (A.M.O.P. Extended Mix) – Beck
  • “Only Just Begun” – Bill Hicks
  • Season Of The Witch – Super Session (Al Kooper, Stephen Stills, Harvey Brooks, Eddie Hoh)
  • A Change Is Going To Come – Baby Huey and the Babysitters
  • Pedagogue Of Young Gods/No One Ever Does – Saul Williams
  • “Unhappy Stranger – Matt Dillon (Kerouac)
  • If There’s Hell Below (Don’t Worry) – Curtis Mayfield
  • “Who Will Survive In America – Gil Scott-Heron
  • “Final-Point” – Bill Hicks
  • Lighten Up – Beastie Boys

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———————————————BOBBY CALERO———————————————-

BREAK THE SILENCE OF THE NIGHT

O, yes,

I say it plain,

America never was America to me,

And yet I swear this oath—

America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,

The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,

We, the people, must redeem

The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.

The mountains and the endless plain–

All, all the stretch of these great green states–

And make America again!

Let America Be America Again by Langston Hughes (1935)

Nation as a Promise

This weekend I honor the great Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., a man who more than most would have understood the weight of the words above. He knew that our Nation is a Promise—a promise that we each make to ourselves, and to our community—a promise of a Shining City upon a Hill. However, as Jesus Christ said as he gave his Sermon on the Mount, “a city that is set on a hill cannot be hidden” (King James Version, Matthew 5:14). Martin Luther King, Jr. understood that not only was it our duty to judge our world, but that in turn it was our burden to be judged.

Our modern view of King’s August 28, 1963 “I Have a Dream” speech has had a tendency to reduce his words to merely a pictorial report of utopia. Yet, when King called for integration, he was speaking of our responsibility to our fellow man, and that true equality means that we all labor together to fulfill the promise of our nation, a promise that we have inherited, and a promise that we renew with each day we continue to build our homes here. King’s dream was not merely one of interracial hand-holding and pleasant afternoons together in the sun, but one where “[…] we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day” (Walenta, 2010). As Greil Marcus (2006) writes in “The Shape of Things To Come,” King’s most celebrated speech was one that “[…] judges the nation, and calls on each member to judge it in turn. The speech calls on each citizen to weigh the nation’s promises against their betrayal […]” (Marcus, p.34).

A Model of Christian Charity

Governor John Winthrop

            President Ronald Reagan was fond of invoking the image of a “shining city” to promulgate a supposed moral superiority and an ideological slant on American exceptionalism, as well as to suggest that our nation could serve as guardian angel and warden for the world. Ultimately, his words were an expression of optimism. They did not take into account the age-old question of “who watches the watchmen?” Nevertheless, as conveyed in the 1630 sermon by Puritan and Massachusetts Bay Colony founder Governor John Winthrop—while aboard the Arbella, which sailed from the Isle of Wight to Salem, Mass.—this status as a City upon a Hill is one to be considered more of a threat than a blessing:

“The eyes of all people are upon us. So that if we shall deal falsely

with our God in this work we have undertaken, and so cause Him to

withdraw His present help from us, we shall be made a story and a

by-word through the world. We shall open the mouths of enemies to

speak evil of the ways of God, and all professors for God’s sake. We

shall shame the faces of many of God’s worthy servants, and cause

their prayers to be turned into curses upon us till we be consumed out

of the good land whither we are going” (Religious Freedom, 2001).

Citizen King in the Great World House

Vs.

The Computerized Plans of Destruction

            As a citizen of the world, King not only appreciated the necessity for community as a prerequisite for peace on earth, but understood that community—regardless of one’s view or relation to it—is by its very nature inescapable; existence is nothing if not a multitude of threads and ligaments, by which each living thing is bound to another and all. Beyond this, King knew the obligation that comes with community. On June 14th, 1965 Dr. King gave a commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio. Entitled “Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution,” the speech was more of a challenge to the graduating class than just a mere attaboy pat on the back and words of congratulations:

“All I’m saying is simply this: that all mankind is tied together;

all life is interrelated, and we are all caught in an inescapable

network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny.

[…] All that I’ve said is that we must work for peace, for racial

justice, for economic justice, and for brotherhood the world over.

We have inherited a big house, a great world house in which we

have to live together—black and white, Easterners and Westerners,

Gentiles and Jews, Protestants and Catholics, Moslem and Hindu.

If we all learn to do this we, in a real sense, will remain awake

through a great revolution (Oberlin College Archives, 2009).

As a true patriot, King not only loved our country and its inherent promise, but also was willing to descry that there is a disease within our nation, and that it was our responsibility as a people to deliver a cure. He knew that it little mattered where in fact Plymouth Rock landed. Regardless of semantics and pedigree, in the words of Woody Guthrie (1940), “This land is your land, this land is my land.” Again, as a patriot, King did not necessarily view the malady as an innate element to our nations principle architecture of government, Democracy, but rather the result of a promise perverted by those in power that seek personal gain through the influence of money and violence.  Furthermore, I believed he viewed our nation’s malaise and inequity as a matter of depraved, cruel, arrogant, and often merely imbecilic value systems growing viral within our culture; a culture becoming a gluttonous creature in blind pursuit of comfort and dollars, obsessed with the distractions of torture and cartoons on the television. If one wonders what is wrong with this world—why these wrongs are prevalent—one need only to take a look at his world; to understand the product, one need only inspect the factory.

Charles Moore, Arrest of Dr. Martin Luther King, 1958. ©Charles Moore/Blackstar/Eyevine

Despite his “I Have A Dream” speech remaining what he is mainly remembered for, I find King’s “Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence” to have endured as one of his most pertinent. On April 4, 1967 (exactly one year prior to his assassination) at Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King delivered these words:

A true revolution of values will soon cause us to question the

fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies.

On the one hand, we are called to play the Good Samaritan on

life’s roadside, but that will be only an initial act. One day we

must come to see that the whole Jericho Road must be transformed

so that men and women will not be constantly beaten and robbed

as they make their journey on life’s highway. True compassion is

more than flinging a coin to a beggar. It comes to see that an edifice

which produces beggars needs restructuring.

A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring

contrast of poverty and wealth. With righteous indignation, it will

look across the seas and see individual capitalists of the West

investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa, and South America,

only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment

of the countries, and say, “This is not just.” It will look at our alliance

with the landed gentry of South America and say, “This is not just.”

The Western arrogance of feeling that it has everything to teach others

and nothing to learn from them is not just. (A More Perfect Union, 2011).

A Beautiful Symphony of Brotherhood.

James Karales, Selma-to-Montgomery March for Voting Rights in 1965, 1965. Photographic print. Located in the James Karales Collection, Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Duke University. Photograph © Estate of James Karales

Essentially, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s message remains one of Hope and Compassion, however, I believe there was a bit more fire & brimstone to his sermons than people care to remember. King knew that Time remains ambivalent to the aspirations of man. King knew that progress is not inevitable, but requires the vigilant struggle and toil of a conscientious community. King knew that with this community we could one day create “a beautiful symphony of brotherhood.” King knew that without this community we are surely damned; our names will remain a stain on history, a curse upon all our offspring’s lips, and a curse upon the lips of God itself.

—The World is a better place for having had this man in it—The World can be a better place for having had this man in it—

Here is a YouTube post with the audio for Dr. King’s speech, Beyond Vietnam: A Time to Break Silence.  Beneath that I have pasted several of what I feel are critical passages from his speech, particularly in the context of our modern world.

“The only change came from America, as we increased our troop commitments in support of governments which were singularly corrupt, inept, and without popular support. All the while the people read our leaflets and received the regular promises of peace and democracy and land reform. Now they languish under our bombs and consider us, not their fellow Vietnamese, the real enemy. They move sadly and apathetically as we herd them off the land of their fathers into concentration camps where minimal social needs are rarely met. They know they must move on or be destroyed by our bombs.

“So they go, primarily women and children and the aged. They watch as we poison their water, as we kill a million acres of their crops. They must weep as the bulldozers roar through their areas preparing to destroy the precious trees. They wander into the hospitals with at least twenty casualties from American firepower for one Vietcong-inflicted injury. So far we may have killed a million of them, mostly children. They wander into the towns and see thousands of the children, homeless, without clothes, running in packs on the streets like animals. They see the children degraded by our soldiers as they beg for food. They see the children selling their sisters to our soldiers, soliciting for their mothers.

“What do the peasants think as we ally ourselves with the landlords and as we refuse to put any action into our many words concerning land reform? What do they think as we test out our latest weapons on them, just as the Germans tested out new medicine and new tortures in the concentration camps of Europe? Where are the roots of the independent Vietnam we claim to be building? Is it among these voiceless ones?

“We have destroyed their two most cherished institutions: the family and the village. We have destroyed their land and their crops. We have cooperated in the crushing—in the crushing of the nation’s only non-Communist revolutionary political force, the unified Buddhist Church. We have supported the enemies of the peasants of Saigon. We have corrupted their women and children and killed their men.

“Now there is little left to build on, save bitterness. Soon, the only solid—solid physical foundations remaining will be found at our military bases and in the concrete of the concentration camps we call “fortified hamlets.” The peasants may well wonder if we plan to build our new Vietnam on such grounds as these. Could we blame them for such thoughts? We must speak for them and raise the questions they cannot raise. These, too, are our brothers.

“Perhaps a more difficult but no less necessary task is to speak for those who have been designated as our enemies. What of the National Liberation Front, that strangely anonymous group we call “VC” or “communists?” What must they think of the United States of America when they realize that we permitted the repression and cruelty of Diem, which helped to bring them into being as a resistance group in the South? What do they think of our condoning the violence, which led to their own taking up of arms? How can they believe in our integrity when now we speak of “aggression from the North” as if there were nothing more essential to the war? How can they trust us when now we charge them with violence after the murderous reign of Diem and charge them with violence while we pour every new weapon of death into their land? Surely we must understand their feelings, even if we do not condone their actions. Surely we must see that the men we supported pressed them to their violence. Surely we must see that our own computerized plans of destruction simply dwarf their greatest acts.

“These are the times for real choices and not false ones. We are at the moment when our lives must be placed on the line if our nation is to survive its own folly. Every man of humane convictions must decide on the protest that best suits his convictions, but we must all protest.

“Now there is something seductively tempting about stopping there and sending us all off on what in some circles has become a popular crusade against the war in Vietnam. I say we must enter that struggle, but I wish to go on now to say something even more disturbing.

“The war in Vietnam is but a symptom of a far deeper malady within the American spirit, and if we ignore this sobering reality…and if we ignore this sobering reality, we will find ourselves organizing “clergy and laymen concerned” committees for the next generation. They will be concerned about Guatemala—Guatemala and Peru. They will be concerned about Thailand and Cambodia. They will be concerned about Mozambique and South Africa. We will be marching for these and a dozen other names and attending rallies without end, unless there is a significant and profound change in American life and policy.

“And so, such thoughts take us beyond Vietnam, but not beyond our calling as sons of the living God.

“In 1957, a sensitive American official overseas said that it seemed to him that our nation was on the wrong side of a world revolution. During the past ten years, we have seen emerge a pattern of suppression which has now justified the presence of U.S. military advisers in Venezuela. This need to maintain social stability for our investments accounts for the counterrevolutionary action of American forces in Guatemala. It tells why American helicopters are being used against guerrillas in Cambodia and why American napalm and Green Beret forces have already been active against rebels in Peru.

“It is with such activity in mind that the words of the late John F. Kennedy come back to haunt us. Five years ago he said, “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” Increasingly, by choice or by accident, this is the role our nation has taken, the role of those who make peaceful revolution impossible by refusing to give up the privileges and the pleasures that come from the immense profits of overseas investments. I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin…we must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights, are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.

“A true revolution of values will soon cause us to question the fairness and justice of many of our past and present policies. On the one hand, we are called to play the Good Samaritan on life’s roadside, but that will be only an initial act. One day we must come to see that the whole Jericho Road must be transformed so that men and women will not be constantly beaten and robbed as they make their journey on life’s highway. True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar. It comes to see that an edifice, which produces beggars needs restructuring.

“A true revolution of values will soon look uneasily on the glaring contrast of poverty and wealth. With righteous indignation, it will look across the seas and see individual capitalists of the West investing huge sums of money in Asia, Africa, and South America, only to take the profits out with no concern for the social betterment of the countries, and say, “This is not just.” It will look at our alliance with the landed gentry of South America and say, “This is not just.” The Western arrogance of feeling that it has everything to teach others and nothing to learn from them is not just.

“A true revolution of values will lay hand on the world order and say of war, “This way of settling differences is not just.” This business of burning human beings with napalm, of filling our nation’s homes with orphans and widows, of injecting poisonous drugs of hate into the veins of peoples normally humane, of sending men home from dark and bloody battlefields physically handicapped and psychologically deranged, cannot be reconciled with wisdom, justice, and love. A nation that continues year after year to spend more money on military defense than on programs of social uplift is approaching spiritual death.

“America, the richest and most powerful nation in the world, can well lead the way in this revolution of values. There is nothing except a tragic death wish to prevent us from reordering our priorities so that the pursuit of peace will take precedence over the pursuit of war. There is nothing to keep us from molding a recalcitrant status quo with bruised hands until we have fashioned it into a brotherhood.

“This kind of positive revolution of values is our best defense against communism. War is not the answer. Communism will never be defeated by the use of atomic bombs or nuclear weapons. Let us not join those who shout war and, through their misguided passions, urge the United States to relinquish its participation in the United Nations. These are days which demand wise restraint and calm reasonableness. We must not engage in a negative anticommunism, but rather in a positive thrust for democracy, realizing that our greatest defense against communism is to take offensive action in behalf of justice. We must with positive action seek to remove those conditions of poverty, insecurity, and injustice, which are the fertile soil in which the seed of communism grows and develops.

“These are revolutionary times. All over the globe men are revolting against old systems of exploitation and oppression, and out of the wounds of a frail world, new systems of justice and equality are being born. The shirtless and barefoot people of the land are rising up as never before. “The people who sat in darkness have seen a great light.” We in the West must support these revolutions.

“It is a sad fact that because of comfort, complacency, a morbid fear of communism, and our proneness to adjust to injustice, the Western nations that initiated so much of the revolutionary spirit of the modern world have now become the arch anti-revolutionaries. This has driven many to feel that only Marxism has a revolutionary spirit. Therefore, communism is a judgment against our failure to make democracy real and follow through on the revolutions that we initiated. Our only hope today lies in our ability to recapture the revolutionary spirit and go out into a sometimes-hostile world declaring eternal hostility to poverty, racism, and militarism. With this powerful commitment we shall boldly challenge the status quo and unjust mores, and thereby speed the day when “every valley shall be exalted, and every mountain and hill shall be made low, and the crooked shall be made straight, and the rough places plain.”

“A genuine revolution of values means in the final analysis that our loyalties must become ecumenical rather than sectional. Every nation must now develop an overriding loyalty to mankind as a whole in order to preserve the best in their individual societies.

“This call for a worldwide fellowship that lifts neighborly concern beyond one’s tribe, race, class, and nation is in reality a call for an all-embracing—embracing and unconditional love for all mankind. This oft misunderstood, this oft misinterpreted concept, so readily dismissed by the Nietzsches of the world as a weak and cowardly force, has now become an absolute necessity for the survival of man. When I speak of love I am not speaking of some sentimental and weak response. I am not speaking of that force which is just emotional bosh. I am speaking of that force which all of the great religions have seen as the supreme unifying principle of life. Love is somehow the key that unlocks the door, which leads to ultimate reality. This Hindu-Muslim-Christian-Jewish-Buddhist belief about ultimate—ultimate reality is beautifully summed up in the first epistle of Saint John: ‘Let us love one another, for love is God. And every one that loveth is born of God and knoweth God. He that loveth not knoweth not God, for God is love.’ ‘If we love one another, God dwelleth in us and his love is perfected in us.’ Let us hope that this spirit will become the order of the day.

“We can no longer afford to worship the god of hate or bow before the altar of retaliation. The oceans of history are made turbulent by the ever-rising tides of hate. And history is cluttered with the wreckage of nations and individuals that pursued this self-defeating path of hate. As Arnold Toynbee says:

“‘Love is the ultimate force that makes for the saving choice of life and good against the damning choice of death and evil. Therefore the first hope in our inventory must be the hope that love is going to have the last word.’

“We are now faced with the fact, my friends, that tomorrow is today. We are confronted with the fierce urgency of now. In this unfolding conundrum of life and history, there is such a thing as being too late. Procrastination is still the thief of time. Life often leaves us standing bare, naked, and dejected with a lost opportunity. The tide in the affairs of men does not remain at flood—it ebbs. We may cry out desperately for time to pause in her passage, but time is adamant to every plea and rushes on. Over the bleached bones and jumbled residues of numerous civilizations are written the pathetic words, “Too late.” There is an invisible book of life that faithfully records our vigilance or our neglect.

“We still have a choice today: nonviolent coexistence or violent co-annihilation. We must move past indecision to action.

“If we do not act, we shall surely be dragged down the long, dark, and shameful corridors of time reserved for those who possess power without compassion, might without morality, and strength without sight.

“And if we will only make the right choice, we will be able to transform this pending cosmic elegy into a creative psalm of peace. If we will make the right choice, we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our world into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. If we will but make the right choice, we will be able to speed up the day, all over America and all over the world, when ‘justice will roll down like waters, and righteousness like a mighty stream’” (A More Perfect Union, 2011).

OK, now that I got that off my chest

Here are a few tracks in tribute of MLK.

First up is perhaps my favorite Public Enemy song, 1991’s “By the Time I Get to Arizona.” Chuck D spits incisive line after incisive line at both the legislature and citizens of Arizona State after their refusal to observe a holiday in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. To give a brief history, Sen. John McCain (Republican of Arizona) voted against the creation of the holiday to honor King, and later defended Arizona Republican Governor Evan Mecham, who in 1987 rescinded a former Democratic governor’s establishment of the holiday. As a result, Arizona lost an estimated $300 million in cancellations of concerts, conventions and the 1993 Super Bowl (Hardigg, 1993).

Arizona State eventually relented to observe the holiday. Now, Arizona has gone on to note that in fact they are the only state that actually voted to recognize the holiday, unlike other states, which simply accepted the federal mandate. To me, however, that sounds like mere revision and spin, and an attempt to distract the issue with State’s Rights. One need only look at recent laws that permit the police force to demand your “papers,” to get a fair sense of Arizona’s collective conscious.

The video for this song was received in scandal due to graphic re-enactments of the civil rights movement and King’s 1968 murder interspersed with scenes of Public Enemy members leading an armed insurrection, which culminates with a series of political assassinations.

The heavy-metal-funk groove prominently featured throughout “By the Time I Get to Arizona” is a sample of the Bed-Stuy funk group that was formed in 1968 by three Panamanian born brothers: Mandrill. The sampled song, “Two Sisters Of Mystery” off of their 1973 album Just Outside Of Town has more in common with Led Zeppelin and Stone Temple Pilots than hip-hop, which goes to show just how eclectic P.E. could be.

Mandrill – Just Outside Of Town (1973)

However, the sample that I find particularly inventive occurs as the break-down when Chuck D grits his teeth and obstinately declares that he’s got twenty-five days to get to Arizona. To complement D’s message and delivery, the music is swallowed whole in a rhythmic swamp of menacing bass/drums and disturbing shrieks. These sounds bring to mind a perturbed vision of a playground massacre. Yet, with such precision, this snippet of looped sound is actually taken from a 1971 live concert by the Jackson 5 while performing a rendition of Isaac Hayes’ “Walk on By.” Recorded for the live/soundtrack album, Goin’ Back to Indiana, The screams are nothing but giddy girls cheering on the slow-step dance routine on stage. What a perfect subversion of sound.

The Jackson 5 – Goin’ Back to Indiana (1971)

Affirming the conclusion that most logical Americans arrive at, “[…] my money’s spent/on the goddamn rent/Neither party is mine/not the jackass or the elephant,” and directly stating the threatening consequences for cultural subjugation, “When the blind get a mind/ Better start fearing while we sing it;” off of Apocalypse 91… The Enemy Strikes Black here’s “By the Time I Get to Arizona.”

—————(Click To Listen)

Like it? Buy it.

Sam Cooke

Up next is Baby Huey and the Babysitters with their 1970 epic rendition of the song that for many came to epitomize the sixties’ Civil Rights Movement: Sam Cooke’s “A Change Is Gonna Come.” I’ve already discussed much of Baby Huey’s brief history and the story behind their Curtis Mayfield produced record elsewhere, so, I’d rather consider the impetus behind the song itself. Written by Cooke while on tour in early 1963 and recorded on December 21 of that same year, “A Change Is Gonna Come” was released on 1964’s Ain’t That Good News, which was comprised of the first material that Cooke had recorded in the six months following the drowning death of his 18-month old son. Unfortunately, this album would also be his last released while alive, as Cooke was murdered under mysterious circumstances nine months after the album’s release; he was 33 years old. Ten days after his death on December 11, 1964, “A Change Is Gonna Come” was released as a single.

Sam Cooke was driven to write this song after being both inspired and filled with anxiety upon hearing Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Cooke felt challenged by the song’s depth and understanding of America’s current climate in regards to race relations. Cooke is quoted as saying, “Jeez, a white boy writing a song like that?” (RollingStone, 2012).

Baby Huey and the Babysitters do Cooke’s song more than justice by swelling it into an epic psychedelic anthem that keeps the integrity of the definition of psychedelic intact: soul-manifesting, or soul-revealing. Punctured with scattergun horns, Baby Huey maneuvers the ballad through various temperaments while relating various humorous but personal asides. The most poignant of these being “There’s three kind of people in this world—There’s White People, there’s Black People, and then there’s My People.”

—————(Click To Listen)

Like it? Buy it.

Third, here’s the song that inspired Cooke to write “A Change Is Gonna Come,” Bob Dylan’s “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Dylan, at the age of 20 in April 1962, introduced this song while onstage at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village, by stating: “This here ain’t no protest song or anything like that, ’cause I don’t write no protest songs” (RollingStone, 2012). He later said that he wrote the song in ten minutes, and anyone familiar with Dylan’s genius will believe him. The version I present was recorded live February 13th, 1974 in Los Angeles during Dylan and The Band’s joint tour. The fact that this tour was the first time Dylan had returned to the road since 1966 is evident in the unrestrained, muscular, and nearly irate delivery of this performance. Through the haze of Garth Hudson’s organ, Robbie Robertson provides some dynamic lead guitar that plays interesting games within the melody.

Bob Dylan and The Band 1974 Tour

Like it? Buy it.

And to conclude, here are the final public words of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. The next day, at 6:01 p.m. on April 4, 1968, he was murdered by a coward while standing on the 2nd floor balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tennessee. If these words do nothing to you then check your pulse.

——————————————Bobby Calero

Ref:

The Holy Bible, King James Version. New York: Meridian, 1974. Print.

A More Perfect Union. (2011) Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.-April 4, 1967-Beyond Vietnam: A Time To Break Silence. A More Perfect Union. Retrieved January 13th, 2012 from http://4amoreperfectunion.blogspot.com/2011/01/rev-martin-luther-king-jr-april-4-1967.html

Cooke, S. A Change Is Going To Come [recorded by Baby Huey and The Babysitters] On The Baby Huey Story: The Living Legend. [CD] Curtom. (1971) Water. (2006)

Dylan, B. (1962). Blowin’ in the Wind [recorded by Bob Dylan and The Band] On Before the Flood. [CD] Asylum. (1974) Sony Legacy. (2009)

Hughes, Langston. (1935). Let America Be America Again. Retrieved January 13th, 2012 from http://www.poets.org/viewmedia.php/prmMID/15609

Marcus, G. (2006) The Shape of Things To Come. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Oberlin College Archives. (2009). Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution. Oberlin College Archives. Retrieved January 13th, 2012 from http://www.oberlin.edu/external/EOG/BlackHistoryMonth/MLK/CommAddress.html

Public Enemy and Island Def Jam Music Group (1991) (Creators). PublicEnemyVEVO (Poster) (2010, Aug. 27). Public Enemy-By The Time I Get To Arizona [Video] Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zrFOb_f7ubw

Ridenhour, Robertz, Gary G, Wiz, Depper, Mandrill, Santiago. (1991). By the Time I Get to Arizona [recorded by Public Enemy] On Apocalypse 91… The Enemy Strikes Black [CD] Def Jam.

Religious Freedom Page. (2001). A Model of Christian Charity. Univerrsity of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 13th, 2012 from http://religiousfreedom.lib.virginia.edu/sacred/charity.html

RollingStone (2011). The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. RollingStone. Retrieved January 14th, 2012 from http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/the-500-greatest-songs-of-all-time-20110407/bob-dylan-blowin-in-the-wind-19691231

RollingStone (2011). The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time. RollingStone. Retrieved January 14th, 2012 from http://www.rollingstone.com/music/lists/the-500-greatest-songs-of-all-time-20110407/sam-cooke-a-change-is-gonna-come-19691231

Walenta, C.  (Ed.). The I Have a Dream Speech by MLK. USConstitution.net. Retrieved January 13th, 2012 from http://www.usconstitution.net/dream.html

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