Category Archives: Hamilton Leithauser

THE DEMISE OF THE MASK (VOL. 8)__Bread & Circus ___

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Hello All.

Welcome to Volume Eight of the MixTape series: The Demise Of The Mask. –(Volume One here)__(Volume Two here)__(Volume Three here)__(Volume Four here)__(Volume Five here)__(Volume Six here)__(Volume Seven here)-

I’ve got quite a treat MixTape here for you as this one features a triple-play by Hamilton Leithauser: first there’s “We Can’t Be Beat” from the last album by his always fantastic group The Walkmen, 2012’s Heaven; then there’s a selection from Leithauser’s 2014 debut solo studio album, Black Hours; and finally there’s the song “When The Truth Is…” from last year’s stunning record I Had a Dream That You Were Mine, which is a collaborative work with Rostam Batmanglij (the former multi-instrumentalist and producer of Vampire Weekend).

You’ll also hear Aretha Franklin, some Beastie Boys, the lovely “Rainbows In Gasoline” by the duo of Sean Lennon and Charlotte Kemp Muhl who record together under the moniker of The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger (or GOASTT), and a fine example of why John Lennon was one of the greatest of rock ‘n’ roll vocalists with The Beatles‘ tune “All I’ve Got To Do.”

As well, there are two selections from the Parliament-Funkadelic collective: first there’s a cover of The Beatles by incendiary yet so sweet guitarist Eddie Hazel from his 1977 solo debut Game, Dames and Guitar Thangs, which features incredible vocals by The Brides of Funkenstein (the duo of Dawn Silva and Lynn Mabry, who prior to joining the P-Funk collective were members of Sly and the Family Stone); later on you’ll catch the revolving, kaleidoscopic groove of “Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication” from Parliament‘s 1975 masterpiece, Mothership Connection.

Oh and I can’t forget to mention the rendition of Magic Sam‘s All Of Your Love” done with grit and precision by The Rolling Stones and taken from their joyous record of blues covers released at the end of last year, Blue & Lonesome.

Among a whole bunch of other great sounds this mix also features two figures who are perhaps the most poetic recording artists of Uruguayan music: Jaime Roos and Eduardo Mateo. The song “Viviendo” is from Roos’ third record, Aquello released in 1981. There is a translation done by my father below for those that are interested:

Viviendo (Living) by Jaime Roos [translated by Julio Calero]
I remember you
You’re the One
Who could understand  it
No big deal
That we do not love each other
You could understand it
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
You’ll find me
Living
.
You’ll hear
The world was
And will be a marvel, I already know
It could be
My voice
Coming out of a nightmare that’s gone
.
Friend, where abouts may you be?
What seas may you be sailing?
Soon we’ll cross paths
And I’ll find you
Living
where abouts may you be?
Living
Alone, perhaps
Living

Throughout his long career Jaime Roos has continued to make an interesting mix of rock and folk with the more traditional sounds of Uruguay like candombe, milonga, tango and murga. He’s still out there performing and I highly recommend that if you ever have the opportunity you should definitely catch his show!

 Eduardo Mateo‘s “Niña” is a sweet tune done by a pure musician, and its recording comes with an interesting story. By the time Mateo’s phenomenal band El Kinto had officially disintegrated in the early part of 1970 most of Mateo’s friends and associates were already convinced that he had gone completely insane. Despite the fact that these same people viewed him as a musical genius, they did not know what to make of his habits of disappearing for days at a time, either to lock himself up somewhere in a rented room to explore new realms on his instrument while searching for spiritual enlightenment through chemicals, or to wander the streets with nothing but pajamas and a guitar—there was always a guitar, a rare constant in this man’s unhinged life. Once, my uncle saw him walking the streets at night with one foot aligned with the curb, the other with the gutter, so that he was forced to maintain an awkward and drastic limp to his gait—how’s that for a metaphor?!

Speaking of this period in Mateo’s life, Uruguayan singer Verónica Indart had this story to tell:

“The last time I saw him was in the first years of the 1970s. I was

with Héctor, my husband, and Mateo arrived. He entered, he took

up the guitar, and he sat down to play by the window, looking at the

sea for a long while. We listened to him. When he finished, he got up,

he set down the guitar and he went out the door without a greeting.

That was Mateo. He arrived, gave us his music and went on without

greeting us, because it was not necessary” (Lion Production, 2006).

In 1971, for those who were fortunate to have heard Mateo play there was no doubt of that man’s overwhelming talent—mental illness or not; however, beyond a handful of tracks there existed little recorded evidence of it. This would soon change due to the influence of talented singer Diane Denoir, and through the dedication and passion of producer Carlos Píriz. Píriz, a recording technician who had worked for the live, music television show Discodromo had recently started the record label De la Planta along with Jorge “Coyo” Abuchalja, guitarist for the group Los Delfines. The ethos behind this venture was to maintain a Uruguayan label that was dedicated to Uruguayan musicians, providing them with better production, recording techniques, and better distribution than the then norm. Fortunately, through Píriz’s connections, they were able to secure regular studio time at ION Studios in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the recording technology was far superior to that found in their native country (four tracks as opposed to two at most, for example).

In October of 1971 one such artist they chose to present to the public was the singer Diane Denoir. As she was recording a fair amount of Mateo’s material for her De la Planta debut, she felt it was only appropriate that the artist himself accompany her on some of the tracks. Having convinced Mateo to take the trip, Píriz quickly took advantage of the rare opportunity by persuading him to stay and record a solo LP for the label. However, in spite of Píriz’s optimistic plans to complete the recording in one week, he soon found that dealing with this erratic artist would be an ultimate test of endurance and patience.

The sessions went like this: Mateo had an alphabetic notebook,

and stuck in each page he had bar napkins upon which his songs

were written. If he knew the first letter of the title of the song he

wished to play, he would find the correct napkin, which would help

him remember the melody, so that he could recreate the original idea

he had envisioned when he had composed the song in the first place.

Remembering the songs was only the first obstacle […]. Mateo

would record songs one day, and erase them the next. “The first day

he recorded three or four things,” Píriz recalled. “The following day

he came in and said, ‘erase them. For Mateo, they are all wrong.’

We erased them. And that process of erasing the previous day’s work

continued for four or five days. At that moment, I understood that this

would be the system for the whole disc […]. I decided that I will be the

person who says what was well-recorded, or not, and I began to keep

all the material.”

On other days, Mateo went to ION studios only to say that he was not

inspired, and would return the next day. Then there were the days that

he appeared at the studio, and asked, “What time do we record tomorrow?”

“The same as today, at four o’clock,” Píriz would say. “Okay I am going,

until tomorrow,” was Mateo’s only reply (Lion Production, 2006).

 –

This whole arduous process continued for two months, until one day when Mateo said to the producer that he was stepping out of the studio to buy a pack of cigarettes, and never came back. He had returned to his streets in Montevideo. Píriz was left holding hours of recordings of these fragmented sessions—the only proof that Mateo had even been there. A labor of love, Píriz would then spend the better part of a year assembling these into the album that would be released in December of 1972: Mateo Solo Bien Se Lame.

One of the thirteen brilliant compositions that Píriz extracted from the chaos is the twisted beauty that is “Niña.” Through his dedication, Píriz was able to capture on this record the complex sensitivity of this troubled artist. Seeing as how, other than a rare background vocal here and there, Mateo created every sound on this album himself, his essence truly shines through each composition. There is a translation of the lyrics done by me below:

Niña (Little Girl) by Eduardo Mateo [translated by Bobby Calero]
Little girl that always has a light
showing you what you do not want.
Do not fear the birds
if they say your life with their trills.
It should be that you understand;
that’s why what comes next is what has gone.
Always in a white dress,
you go but beware;
The devils in the guise of angels
will notice you talking.
Does it shame you that you don’t care
what has been soiled?
Yuu…yu-le-lé yu-lé.
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If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom

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—————–======ENJOY YOURSELF____———–

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS:
__The Demise Of The Mask (Vol 8)__Bread & Circus ___
  • Pick Pocket – Andy Votel
  • I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)
  • All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles
  • Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin
  • Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions
  • Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
  • Been & Gone – Annette Peacock
  • Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs
  • I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers
  • Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra
  • Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament
  • Kissing My Love – Afrique
  • Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys
  • All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover)
  • Viviendo – Jaime Roos
  • We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen
  • Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser
  • When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam
  • Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger
  • Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader
  • Niña – Eduardo Mateo
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[Pick Pocket - Andy Votel]

[Pick Pocket – Andy Votel]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[I Want You (She’s So Heavy) – Eddie Hazel (The Beatles cover)]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[All I’ve Got To Do – The Beatles]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Rock Steady – Aretha Franklin]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Secondary Modern – Elvis Costello & The Attractions]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots (photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Church On Tuesday – Stone Temple Pilots
(photo by Mick Hutson)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Been & Gone – Annette Peacock (photo by Richard Davis, 1972)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[Royal Cream / I Am Fire – The Afghan Whigs (photo by Piper Ferguson, 2014)]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[I Wish I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again – The Staple Singers]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Medicine For A Nightmare – Sun Ra (art by Oliver Barrett)]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Supergroovalisticprosifunkstication – Parliament]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Kissing My Love – Afrique]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[Dub The Mic / Gratitude – Beastie Boys]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[All Of Your Love – The Rolling Stones (Magic Sam cover) (photo by Kevin Winter, 2016)]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[Viviendo – Jaime Roos]

[We Can't Be Beat - The Walkmen]

[We Can’t Be Beat – The Walkmen]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[Alexandra – Hamilton Leithauser]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[When The Truth Is… – Hamilton Leithauser + Rostam]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Rainbows In Gasoline – The Ghost Of A Saber Tooth Tiger]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Que Tristeza – Cal Tjader]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

[Niña – Eduardo Mateo]

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___________________))))))))))))))))

All the best to you and yours!—  –   ————-______-________ ->BOBBY CALERO[—+=-_________________If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig an artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff. Oh, If you dig the blog overall there’s always the “FOLLOW BLOG VIA EMAIL” button somewhere down at the bottom.

_           _________________   _  ___   _ _________ __________->

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 14)

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig a particular artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

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Being the most up-front pop-oriented of them, if any representatives from the last of the commercial sub-genres listed above were ever to land a hit to temporarily dominate the charts for a season or two then it was likely penned, recorded (and often digitally assembled note-for-note, syllable-by-syllable) by a cabal of nine middle-aged Nordic men. Although their birth certificates stated names that would likely bring to the average American mind images of Vikings or monks, they were typically credited under monikers that were easily forgettable despite their frequent use of the letters Z and X and honorary titles, such as Dr. Cztarlab, Sir LapLux, Mr. Mixus, and Professor JaMeZ. Almost no one would really ever recall these writers’ professional pseudonyms or note the central role they played in the hits that were so pervasive in their lives. These facts of anonymity were by design, as they did not want to interfere with the ascendency and celebrity of the “artist” that was to sell their work to the masses.

Through focus-group brand testing and weeks-long song-writing “cook-outz” where the annual trajectory of a (largely absent) performer’s career could be plotted by the continuity of tunes assigned to them, this committee had perfected a formula for pop familiarity—and thus, top ten hits. Not to oversimplify their equation, but it could be described as so: the forward swirl and bright texture of say, ABBA’s “SOS” but manufactured in a manner that ensured it could effortlessly and cyclically give way to the emphatic gush and catch of an arena-sized shout-along, something akin to the big-rock, chest-thump chorus in Bon Jovi’s “Livin’ On A Prayer.” With these elements married and laid atop a plush bed of programmed beats (or beatz) borrowed from the latest fashions in re-heated Hip Hop and R&B, all that was needed to complete the job was the appropriate vehicle to deliver the song. Sold to a Star-Creation division operating in-house under one of the various record-label executives, the likely hit-song could then be allocated either to a veteran presence or one of the newer recruits from the pop-celebrity academies.

The sound was always bigger & brighter & brighter & bigger. The sound should have little trouble in filling a stadium. Yet, it rarely needed to fill a stadium, but the sound must fill a shopping complex daily. Yes, the genuine smash hit was truly achieved when it facilitated an easy browse along the aisles of capitalism—interrupting consumption only long enough for an involuntary duet between pop star and shopper, a reflex response from the teaser tinsel of the pre-chorus build and the persistent bass and treble hook of the chorus returning again and returning again. At times the production could be so seamless, so unremarkable, so successful that one could pause and ask themselves: How do I know this song? Have I always known it? Has this song always been here?

With these narrow options before her, what was a girl to listen to? There was the feminine powerhouses of the Divas; at least they were aggressively advertised as such. These “Queens” and “Ladies” were always presented in context to the objects in their orbits: the relationships new or sour; the clothes; the hair; the promotional tie-Ins; the prop outrage performed on an award ceremony stage; the boyfriends and husbands; their current positions on the charts; their current positions in the rotating feuds between the other Divas. Watching music videos one day after school with her best friend since ninth grade, Rebecca turned to her and said: “Ugh, these role-model bitches are always either selling church or snatch.” Mireille laughed until she snorted. It was true, those who were not peddling their brand with the accompanying image of Clean American could be found rolling their eyes, spreading their legs, and retailing their lives under a banner that read Liberated & Nasty. Purchased from the Nordic committee, they all currently had the pull of a melody that was so easy to babble-along to. The Divas’ singles could be fun, but listening to them, Mireille reasoned, would make her feel like merely some consequence of a premise.

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dendrites_cvr_14

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Water or Bread (Raining) – Madlib

Metamorphosis – Miles Okazaki (w/ Dan Weiss, Christof Knoche, Jon Flaugher, Miguel Zenon, David Binney, and Chris Potter)

To Sheila – Smashing Pumpkins [photo by Yelena Yemchuk]

Sonic Armada – Air

Morning Fog – Danger Mouse & Daniele Luppi

Green Belly – Ty Segall

Hidee Hidee Ho #16 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, Marcus Mumford, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]

Shaman’s Blues – The Doors (Jim Morrison in the closet of his room at LA’s Chateau Marmont hotel, by Art Kane, May 1968.) 

Paint a Lady – Susan Christie

Strawberry Wine – Ryan Adams [photo by Mark Seliger]

Crystals – Bennie Maupin

Synthesizer – Outkast (ft. George Clinton)

What I saw – Broadcast & The Focus Group

Twinkle/Master Teacher – Erykah Badu [photo by Timothy Saccenti, 2008]

Polly – Duke Ellington

The Silent Orchestra – Hamilton Leithauser

sinatra

I See Your Face Before Me – Frank Sinatra

Hidee Hidee Ho #11 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Jim James, Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Marcus Mumford, Bo Koster, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]

Stay (Faraway, So Close!) – U2

Homme Lune – Air

Black Noise – Rotary Connection

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 14)

  • Water or Bread (Raining) – Madlib
  • Metamorphosis – Miles Okazaki (w/ Dan Weiss, Christof Knoche, Jon Flaugher, Miguel Zenon, David Binney, and Chris Potter)
  • To Sheila – Smashing Pumpkins
  • Sonic Armada – Air
  • Morning Fog – Danger Mouse & Daniele Luppi
  • Green Belly – Ty Segall
  • Hidee Hidee Ho #16 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith, Jim James, Marcus Mumford, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]
  • Shaman’s Blues – The Doors
  • Paint a Lady – Susan Christie
  • Strawberry Wine – Ryan Adams 
  • Crystals – Bennie Maupin
  • Synthesizer – Outkast (ft. George Clinton)
  • What I saw – Broadcast & The Focus Group
  • Twinkle/Master Teacher – Erykah Badu 
  • Polly – Duke Ellington
  • The Silent Orchestra – Hamilton Leithauser
  • I See Your Face Before Me – Frank Sinatra
  • Hidee Hidee Ho #11 – The New Basement Tapes (ft. Jim James, Rhiannon Giddens, Elvis Costello, Taylor Goldsmith,  Marcus Mumford, Bo Koster, produced by T Bone Burnett) [lyrics by Bob Dylan]
  • Stay (Faraway, So Close!) – U2
  • Homme Lune – Air
  • Black Noise – Rotary Connection

<^>_ _ _ __=========================================     ______BOBBY CALERO

If you dig the mix then please feel free to pass & post it along; if you dig a particular artist then please support them and go out and pick up some of their stuff.

A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (VOL. 2)

Mireille had grown weary of feeling that our experience of existence had unavoidably resulted in a tape delay.

“We are held hostage in someone else’s head…and in the end…and in our own. Regret will only get you ugly in the end.”

She considered the device currently slipped within a little zippered pocket inside her purse: plastic, glass, semiconductor chips of silicon, and rare earth minerals molded and arranged into a slim rectangle of circuit boards and a touchscreen with a friendly graphic user interface. Contemplating all it was capable of—all of its known, numerous applications, the ones she hasn’t figured out yet and the ones she didn’t care to—she asked herself:

“We’re already living in the future…aren’t we? …Or as far as this future is gonna go, really. From here-on-out and for awhile now it’s all just restatements of a theme, sure with a few innovative variations and tempo changes thrown in to keep us back-slap-smiling, ‘gee–whiz, how neat, this cutting-edge changes everything! Science will save us!’ But, shouldn’t we be somewhere else?

“Shouldn’t we be somewhere else and doing something other by now?”

A sudden nudge—Mireille felt a petite twitch of an impulse to check for updates and status changes. She rolled back the teeth of a zipper, then another, and pulled the phone from her bag. After a swipe, tap, tap, tap, tap of an index finger, another tap brought her to her home page. Lately, every time she logged in to her YouLoop account, over the remote din of row upon row of massive servers roaring away at some installation on a rural sprawl, an advert for an apparel company would pop-up with polished photos of professional mannequins—all so slender and young, all so pale-pink and fair-peach in skin tone, some sullen in denim, others with open mouths in graphic tees cavorting across the afternoon gloss of an open field—all asking in a bold white font atop a black background:

Who will be

“How the hell should I know?” Mireille said to herself. “How could anyone, when we don’t even know what these bundles of qualities we carry and call the self is right now at this moment?” After a distracted scroll down her digital profile’s wall, she logged off. Her phone was returned to its place.

Mireille had grown weary of feeling that our experience of existence had unavoidably resulted in a tape delay. Her suspicion was one of a procession of intervals. Each arriving on the heels of the other, there was enough space for our consciousness to spill a portion of its contents until they coil up to that moment’s capacity. Consciousness, that capo di tutti capi, with its arrogant tap to its bucket snout, yet so unaware of the sway on our days held by flora in the gut and all that other bacteria.

Once full we move on to the next container, but not before an often-inarticulate logging of our impressions on each repetitive step and making a remark or two about every noticeable variable. These recorded findings then color our notes on the subsequent one. Was that our allotted life, spinning on a color wheel? It is as if all our moments were truly only and always movements—some busy derivation from the game of hopscotch.

We scratch symmetry across the surface. We toss the little wet stone of our mind out into an interspersed series of linear and lateral blocks. We dance to retrieve it. We repeat the pattern.

However, here each lope and lollop to another square necessitates the player to perform a change of clothes to correspond with the color assigned to that box, while still taking into account the hue and tint from which they came. We amend our raiment—through Primary to Secondary to Tertiary—and every which way shade between. We slip on robust costumes and strut our feathers. Sometimes we are caught by the garish contrast of a complimentary pair and are required to dress in all white or all black. At other times our skitter through the squares causes us to consider too many pigments and we are left to squirm under attires like mud or wet cinder. But another hop could change all that: just a footstep away from that soot. One is almost certain that if they were to continue to play the game through they’d eventually land upon a true hue of you.

In our gambol across the grid we create relationships. We celebrate. We snicker. We share secrets.

In addition to this facet of the game, where catwalk runway and dressing room coalesce, we mustn’t forget the squares’ designated numbers and verse from their attendant Magpie Rhymes:

Zero for Earth;

One for sorrow,

Two for mirth;

Three for a wedding,

Four for birth;

Five for wealthy,

Six for poor;

Seven for some secret,

Forgotten Door;

Eight for a wish of Heaven,

Nine for a kiss of Hell;

And Ten a surprise for the Devils,

Who pray you get well!

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Intro – Martina Topley-Bird

Oh Yeah – Foxygen

Every Boy and Girl – Lee Moses

Needles & Pins [alt. take] – Ramones

Let It Kill You – Imani Coppola

Looks Good With Trouble – Solange

Time 2 – Pharoahe Monch

Battling the City – Lilacs & Champagne

Your Brain Is Made of Candy – Mourn

Water – Juan Wauters

Clean [snippet] – Taylor Swift

New Mutation Boogie – Invisible Familiars

Gamma Ray (acoustic version) – Beck

Someone Like You – David Vandervelde

Sadder Day – Stephanie McKay

Fade Away And Radiate – Blondie

Laughing With A Mouth Of Blood – St. Vincent

Trouble Blues – Sam Cooke

U Looz – PRhyme (Royce da 5’9″ and DJ Premier)

Gimme A Chance – Azealia Banks

I Retired – Hamilton Leithauser

Poison – Martina Topley-Bird

Call The Law – Outkast (ft. Janelle Monáe)

Corner Pocket – Count Basie & His Orchestra

Biting My Nails – Genevieve Waite

Parakeet – Damon Albarn

Naked We Come– (by Jim Morrison – read by Johnny Depp)

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A MOUTHFUL OF PENNIES PRESENTS: DENDRITES (Vol. 2)

  • Intro – Martina Topley-Bird
  • Oh Yeah – Foxygen
  • Every Boy and Girl – Lee Moses
  • Needles & Pins [alt. take] – Ramones
  • Let It Kill You – Imani Coppola
  • Looks Good With Trouble – Solange
  • Time 2 – Pharoahe Monch
  • Battling the City – Lilacs & Champagne
  • Your Brain Is Made of Candy – Mourn
  • Water – Juan Wauters
  • Clean [snippet] – Taylor Swift
  • New Mutation Boogie – Invisible Familiars
  • Gamma Ray (Acoustic) – Beck
  • Someone Like You – David Vandervelde
  • Sadder Day – Stephanie McKay
  • Fade Away And Radiate – Blondie
  • Laughing With A Mouth Of Blood – St. Vincent
  • Trouble Blues – Sam Cooke
  • U Looz – PRhyme (Royce da 5’9″ and DJ Premier)
  • Gimme A Chance – Azealia Banks
  • I Retired – Hamilton Leithauser
  • Poison – Martina Topley-Bird
  • Call The Law – Outkast (ft. Janelle Monáe)
  • Corner Pocket – Count Basie & His Orchestra
  • Biting My Nails – Genevieve Waite
  • Parakeet – Damon Albarn
  • Naked We Come – (by Jim Morrison – read by Johnny Depp)

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——————————————-BOBBY CALERO—————————–